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Plato - Quotes

Socrates sat down next to him and said, “How wonderful it would be, dear Agathon, if the foolish were filled with wisdom simply by touching the wise. If only wisdom were like water, which always flows from a full cup into an empty one when we connect them with a piece of yarn - well, then I would consider it the greatest prize to have the chance to lie down next to you.”
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

As I say, he said Phaedrus spoke first, beginning more or less like this: Love is a great god, wonderful in many ways to gods and men, and most marvelous of all is the way he came into being. We honor him as one of the most ancient gods, and the proof of his great age is this: the parents of Love have no place in poetry or legend. According to Hesiod, the first to be born was Chaos... and Acusilaus agrees with Hesiod: after Chaos came Earth and Love, these two.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

I cannot say what greater good there is for a young boy than a gentle lover, or for a lover than a boy to love. There is a certain guidance each person needs for his whole life, if he is to live well; and nothing imparts this guidance as well as Love. What guidance do I mean? I mean a sense of shame at acting shamefully, and a sense of pride in acting well. Without these, nothing fine or great can be accomplished, in public or in private.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

What I say is this: if a man in love is found doing something shameful, or accepting shameful treatment because he is a coward and makes no defense, then nothing would give him more pain than being seen by the boy he loves- not even being seen by his father or his comrades.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

We see the same thing also in the boy he loves, that he is especially ashamed before his lover when he is caught in something shameful. If only there were a way to start a city or an army made up of lovers and the boys they love!
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchingson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

As you can see, the eager courage of love wins highest honors from the gods.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Love is not in himself noble and worthy of praise; that depends on whether the sentiments he produces in us are themselves noble.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators).in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

That’s why those who are inspired by her Love are attracted to the male; they find pleasure in what is by nature stronger and more intelligent … I am convinced that a man who falls in love with a young man of this age is generally prepared to share everything with the one he loves - he is eager, in fact, to spend the rest of his own life with him.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

These vulgar lovers are the people who have given love such a bad reputation that some have gone so far as to claim that taking any man as a lover is in itself disgraceful. Would anyone make this claim if he weren’t thinking of how hasty vulgar lovers are, and therefore unfair to their loved ones?
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

First, why we consider it shameful to yield too quickly: the passage of time in itself provides a good test in these matters. Second, why we also consider it shameful for a man to be seduced by money or political power, either because he cringes at ill-treatment and will not endure it or because, once he has tasted the benefits of wealth and power, he will not rise above them. None of these benefits is stable or permanent, apart from the fact that no genuine affection can possibly be based upon them.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

When an older lover and young man come together each obeys the principle appropriate to him - when the lover realizes that he is justified in doing anything for a loved one who grants him favors, and when the young man understands that he is justified in performing any service for a lover who can make him wise and virtuous - and when the lover is able to help the young man become wiser and better, and the young man is eager to be taught and improved by his lover - then, and only then, when these two principles coincide absolutely, is it ever honorable for a young man to accept a lover.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Heraclitus probably meant that an expert musician creates a harmony by resolving the prior discord between high and low notes. For surely there can be no harmony so long as high and low are still discordant; harmony, after all, is consonance, and consonance is a species of agreement. Discordant elements, as long as they are still in discord cannot come to an agreement, and they therefore cannot produce a harmony. Rhythm, for example, is produced only when fast and slow, through earlier discordant, are brought into agreement with each other. Music, like medicine, creates agreement by producing concord and love between these various opposites. Music is therefore simply the science of the effects of Love on rhythm and harmony.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Symposium.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

And there remains, Adeimantus, only a very small group who consort with philosophy in a way that’s worthy of her: A noble and well brought-up character, for example, kept down by exile, who remains with philosophy according to his nature because there is no one to corrupt him, or a great soul living in a small city, who disdains the city’s affairs and looks beyond them.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Republic.” G.M.A. Grube, rev. C.D.C Reeve (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

It follows from our previous agreements, first, that the best men must have sex with the best women as frequently as possible, while the opposite is true of the most inferior men and women, and, second, that if our herd is to be of the highest possible quality, the former’s offspring must be reared but not the latter’s. And this must be brought about without being noticed by anyone except the rulers, so that our herd of guardians remains as free from dissension as possible.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Republic.” G.M.A. Grube, rev. C.D.C Reeve (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

We agreed that ease in learning, a good memory, courage and high-mindedness belong to the philosophic nature.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Republic.” G.M.A. Grube, rev. C.D.C Reeve (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Third comes the kind of madness that is possession by the Muses, which takes a tender virgin soul and awakens it to a Bacchic frenzy of songs and poetry that glorifies the achievements of the past and teaches them to future generations.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

If anyone comes to the gates of poetry and expects to become an adequate poet by acquiring expert knowledge of the subject without the Muses’ madness, he will fail, and his self-controlled verses will be eclipsed by the poetry of men who have been driven out of their minds.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

The reason there is so much eagerness to see the plain where truth stands is that this pasture has the grass that is the right food for the best part of the soul, and it is the nature of the wings that lift up the soul to be nourished by it.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Each soul chooses the life it wants. From there, a human soul can enter a wild animal, and a soul that was once human can move from an animal to a human being again. But a soul that never saw the truth cannot take a human shape, since a human being must understand speech in terms of general forms, proceeding to bring many perceptions together into a reasoned unity. That process is the recollection of the things our soul saw when it was traveling with god, when it disregarded the things we now call real and lifted up its head to what is truly real instead.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

But not every soul is easily reminded of the reality there by what it finds here - not souls that got only a brief glance at the reality there, not souls who had such bad luck when they fell down here that they were twisted by bad company into lives of injustice so that they forgot the sacred objects they had seen before. Only a few remain whose memory is good enough; and they are startled when they see an image of what they saw up there. Then they are beside themselves, and their experience is beyond comprehension because they cannot fully grasp what it is that they are seeing.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

A recent initiate, however, one who has seen much in heaven - when he sees a godlike face or bolidy form that has captured Beauty well, first he shudders and a fear comes over him like those he felt at the earlier time; then he gazes at him with the reverence due a god and if he weren’t afraid people would think hiim completely mad, he’d even sacrifice to his boy as if he were the image of a god.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Like a child whose teeth are just starting to grow in, and its gums are all aching and itching - that is exactly how the soul feels when it beings to grow wings. It swells up and aches and tingles as it gorws them. But when it looks upon the beauty of the boy and takes in the stream of particles flowing into it from his beauty (that is why this is called desire), when it is watered and warmed by this, then all its pain subsides and is replaced by joy. When, however, it is separated from the boy and runs dry, then the openings of the passages in which the feathers grow are dried shut and keep the wings from sprouting. Then the stump of each father is blocked in its desire and it throbs like a pulsing artery while the feather pricks at its passageway, with the result that whole soul is stung all around, and the pain simply drives wild- but then when it remembers the boy in his beauty it recovers its joy.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

From the outlandish mix of these two feelings - pain and joy - comes anguish and helpless raving; in its madness the lover’s soul cannot sleep at night or stay put by day; it rushes, yearning, whereever it expects to see the person who has that beauty. When it does see him, it opens the sluice-gates of desire and sets free the parts that were blocked up before. And now that the pain and the goading have stopped, it can catch its breath and once more suck in, for the moment this sweetest of all pleasures.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Now when the charioteer looks in the eye of love, his entire soul is suffused with a sense of warmth and starts to fill with tingles and the goading of desire. As for the horses, the one who is obedient for the charioteer is still controlled, then as always, by its sense of shame, and so prevents itself from jumping on the boy.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

When the charioteer sees that face, his memory is carried back to the real nature of Beauty, and he seees it again where it stands on the sacred pedestal next to Self-control. At the sight he is frightened, falls over backwards awestruck, and at the same time has to pull the reins back so fiercely that that both horses are set on their haunches, one falling back voluntarily with no resistance, but the other insolent and quite unwilling.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Think how a breeze or an echo bounces back from a smooth solid object to its source; that is how the stream of beauty goes back to the beautiful boy and sets him aflutter. It enters through his eyes, which are its natural route to the soul; there it waters the passages for the wings, starts the wings growing and fills the soul of the loved one with love in return. Then the boy is in love but has no idea what he loves.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

Socrates: All the great arts require endless talk and ethereal speculation about nature: This seems to be what gives them their lofty point of view about universal applicability.
Plato and John M. Cooper (Editor) and D.S. Hutchinson (Associate Editor). “Phaedrus.” Alexander Nehemas and Paul Woodruff (Translators) in: Plato Complete Works. Hackett Publishing Company. 1997. Hardcover, 1747 pages. Language, English, ISBN: 0872203492.

SOC:: But Crito, why should we be so concerned about people will think? Reasonable men, who are the ones worth considering, will believe that things happened as they did.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “CRITO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887. SOC: My dear Crito, your eagerness is worth much, if rightly directed. But if not, then the greater it is, the worse. We must consider carefully whether this thing is to be done, for I am now and always have been the sort of man who is persuaded only by the argument which on reflection proves best to me, and I cannot throw over arguments I formerly accepted merely because of what has come; they still seem much the same to me, and I honor them as I did before. If we can’t find better ones, be assured that I will not give way to you, not even if the power of the multitude were far greater than it now is to frighten us like children with its threats of confiscation, bonds and death.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator with Comment). “CRITO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Suppose a man goes in for athletics. Does he pay attention to the opinions, praise and blame, of everybody, or only the one man who is his physician or trainer?
CRI: Only the one.
SOC: Then he ought to welcome the praise and fear the blame of that one man, not of the multitude.
CRI: Clearly.
SOC: So he is to train and exercise, eat and drink, in a way that seems good to a supervisor who knows and understands, rather than anyone else.
CRI: True.
SOC: Very well. But if he disobeys that supervisor, scorns his judgment and praises, values those of the multitude who are without understanding, won’t he suffer an evil?
CRI: Of course.
SOC: What is that evil? Whither does it tend, and into what possession of the man who disobeys?
CRI: Into the body, clearly, for it ruins that.
SOC: Right. And isn’t this also true in other matters, Crito? We don’t need to run through them all, but isn’t is especially true of what is just and unjust, honorable and shameful, good and evil - just the things our decision is now concerned with? Are we to fear and follow the multitude in such matters? Or is it rather the opinion of one man, if he but have knowledge, which we must reverence and fear beyond all the rest? Since, if we do not follow it, we will permanently damage and corrupt something that we used to say becomes better by justice and is harmed by injustice. Or is there no such thing?
CRI: I certinaly think there is, Socrates.

Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “CRITO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Then in light of these arguments, we must consider whether or not it would be right for me to try to escape without permission of the Athenians. If it proves right, let us try; if not let us dismiss the matter. But as for these other considerations you raise about loss of money and raising children and what people think - Crito, those are really fit topics for people who lightly kill and would raise to life again without a thought if they could - the multitude.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “CRITO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

MEN: And there are a great many other virtues, so that there is no perplexity in saying what virtue is. For each of us, there is a virtue with respect to each particular activity and time of life, and in relation to each particular function. The same is also true of vice, Socrates.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Well Meno, do think it is only true of virtue that it is one thing for a man, another for a woman, and so on? Or is this also true of health and size and strength? Do you think health is one thing for a man, and another for a woman? Or is health, if it is to be health, the same character everywhere, whether in man or anything else?
MEN: I would say that health is the same for both man and woman.
SOC: What about size and strength, then? If a woman is strong, will she not be strong by reason of the same character, the same strength? By “the same” I mean this: strength does not differ, in respect of being strength whether it be in a man or woman. Or do you think there is some difference?

Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: … but with friends who wish to converse with each other, as in our case, a gentler answer is indicated, one more suited to dialectic. It is more dialectical not only to answer what is true, but to do so in terms which the respondent further agrees that he knows.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Then it is clear that these people, who do not recognize evils for what they are, do not desire evils; rather, they desire things they suppose to be good, though in fact those things are evil. Hence, these people, not recognizing evils to be evils, and supposing them to be goods, really desire goods. No so?
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: So it follows from your own admissions that virtue is doing whatever one may do with a part of virtue, since you say that justice and the rest are parts of virtue. What do I mean by that? Just this: I begged you to say what virtue is as a whole, but you, so far from saying what it is, claim that every action is virtue if it is done with a part of virtue - as though you already had said what virtue as a whole is, and I am at this point to understand even if you break it into parts. So it seems to me that you must start from the beginning with the same question, my dear Meno: What is virtue? For that is what is being said when someone says that every action done with justice is virtue. Don’t you think you need to go back to the original question? Or do you think someone knows what a part of virtue is, without knowing what virtue is?
MEN: I do not.

Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Do you see, Meno, that I am teaching him nothing but am asking him all these things? And now he thinks he knows the length of the side from which the eight-foot figure will be generated. Do you agree?
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

ANY: Why, I expect they learned from their elders, who were gentlemen too. Do you deny that there have been many good men in this city?
SOC: No, Anytus, I think there are good in political life here, and that their predecessors were not inferior to them. But have they been good teachers of their own virtue? Our discussion is about that; not whether there are good men here now, or formerly, but whether virtue is taught.

Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: We’ve been asking for some time, and to ask that is to ask this: Do good men, whether of our time or earlier, actually know how to hand down to someone else the virtue in which their goodness consists, or is it impossible for a man to hand it on or receive it from another?
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: So no one could claim his son’s nature was bad.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Then it appears, Meno, that virtue comes to be present by divine apportionment in those whom it comes. But we shall only know that with clear certainty when, before inquiring how virtue comes to be present in men, we first undertake to inquire what virtue is.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “MENO”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

GOR: Because, Socrates, the knowledge involved in other arts is almost completely about manual labor and such activities, whereas rhetoric is nothing of the sort; its whole action and authority is through speeches. That is why I deem it proper to say that the art of rhetoric is about speeches - and this puts it correctly, as I claim.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Therefore, the rhetorician does not provide instruction to courts and other assemblies about things which are just and unjust. He only creates belief. For after all, it would be impossible to instruct so large a crowd in a short time about matters of such importance … I’ve been asking for some time what power rhetoric has; for its greatness appears almost preternatural to me.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Rhetoric, according to my account, is an insubstantial image of a part of politics.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: I say that two arts correspond to these two objects. One art, dealing with the soul, I call politics. The other art deals with the body. I can’t give you a name for it, but I say that gymnastic and medicine are two parts of a single art of serving the body. In politics put law-giving for gymnastic and let corrective justice be the counterpart of medicine. Each of them has something in common with the other medicine with gymnastics justice with law-giving because they are concerned with the same object ...
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: Because the greatest of evils is the doing of injustice.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

SOC: But according to my opinion, Polus, he who does injustice, the unjust man, is utterly wretched; more wretched, however, if he is not punished and does not pay the penalty, and less wretched if he does pay and meets with justice at the hands of gods and men.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.

And goods, namely pleasures, are present to those who are pleased, when they are pleased.
Plato and R.E. Allen (Translator). “GORGIAS”. in: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus: The Dialogues of Plato Volume I. Yale University Press. 1984. Paperback, 350 pages, Language English, ISBN: 0300044887.