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Desiderius Erasmus - Quotes

    

When I get a little money, I buy books; and if any is left, I buy food and clothes. My luggage is my library. My home is where my books are.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

A good portion of speaking will consist in knowing how to lie.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

He who allows oppression shares the crime.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

Give light, and the darkness will disappear of itself.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

Great abundance of riches cannot be gathered and kept by any man without sin.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

In the kingdom of the blind the one-eyed man is king..
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

It is the friendship of books that has made me perfectly happy.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

Erasmus, Desiderius. No Man is wise at all Times, or is without his blind Side.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator).The Apophthegmes of Erasmus. Lincolnshire. 1877.
Erasmus, Desiderius and Nicholas Udall (Translator). The Apopthegmes of Erasmus. Cornell University Library. 2009. Paperback, 488 pages, Language English, ISBN: 1112078991.

I consider as lovers of books not those who keep their books hidden in their store-chests and never handle them, but those who, by nightly as well as daily use thumb them, batter them, wear them out, who fill out all the margins with annotations of many kinds, and who prefer the marks of a fault they have erased to a neat copy full of faults.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

There is no doubt about Martin Luther's marriage, but the rumour about his wife's early confinement is false; she is said however to be pregnant now. If there is truth in the popular legend, that Antichrist will be born from a monk and a nun (which is the story these people keep putting about), how many thousands of Antichrists the world must have already!
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

A constant element of enjoyment must be mingled with our studies, so that we think of learning as a game rather than a form of drudgery, for no activity can be continued for long if it does not to some extent afford pleasure to the participant.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

Indeed, a constant element of enjoyment must be mingled with our studies, so that we think of learning as a game rather than a form of drudgery.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

You must acquire the best knowledge first, and without delay; it is the height of madness to learn what you will later have to unlearn.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

I have turned my entire attention to Greek. The first thing I shall do, as soon as the money arrives, is to buy some Greek authors; after that, I shall buy clothes.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters (1484-1500). University of Toronto Press. 1974.

In the country of the blind, the cross-eyed man is king.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Collected Works of Erasmus. Trans. Denis L. Drysdall. University of Toronto Press. 2005.

When you can run away, don’t look for a quarrel.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Collected Works of Erasmus. Trans. Denis L. Drysdall. University of Toronto Press. 2005.

Good fortune has many friends.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Collected Works of Erasmus. Trans. Denis L. Drysdall. University of Toronto Press. 2005.

Even a fly has a spleen.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Collected Works of Erasmus. Trans. Denis L. Drysdall. University of Toronto Press. 2005.

The camel asked for horns and lost his ears too.
Erasmus, Desiderius. The Collected Works of Erasmus. Trans. Denis L. Drysdall. University of Toronto Press. 2005.

The purpose, of course, is this: those who understand become more and more pleased with themselves and those who don’t are the more impressed the less they understand
Erasmus, Desiderius. In Praise of Folly. Trans. Roger Clarke. One World Classics. 2008.

This type of man who is devoted to the study of wisdom is always most unlucky in everything, and particularly when it comes to procreating children; I imagine this is because Nature wants to ensure that the evils of wisdom shall not spread further throughout mankind..
Erasmus, Desiderius. In Praise of Folly. Trans. Roger Clarke. One World Classics. 2008.

These people, who are in reality the greatest morons but want to be regarded as intellectuals and philosophers* – surely we’ve an excel- lent right to call them ‘morosophers.’
Erasmus, Desiderius. In Praise of Folly. Trans. Roger Clarke. One World Classics. 2008.

I have no patience with those who say that sexual excitement is shameful and that venereal stimuli have their origin not in nature, but in sin. Nothing is so far from the truth. As if marriage, whose function cannot be fulfilled without these incitements, did not rise above blame. In other living creatures, where do these incitements come from? From nature or from sin? From nature, of course. It must borne in mind that in the apetites of the body there is very little difference between man and other living creatures. Finally, we defile by our imagination what of its own nature is fair and holy. If we were willing to evaluate things not according to the opinion of the crowd, but according to nature itself, how is it less repulsive to eat, chew, digest, evacuate, and sleep after the fashion of dumb animals, than to enjoy lawful and permitted carnal relations?

Erasmus, Desiderius. Quoted in: Erasmus on Women. Erika Rummel. University of Toronto Press. 1996.

Wherever you encounter truth, look upon it as Christianity.
Erasmus, Desiderius. Quoted in: The Right to Heresy.  Trans. Staffan Z. Weig. The Beacon Press. 1951.

There is nothing I congratulate myself on more heartily than on never having joined a sect.
Erasmus, Desiderius. Quoted in: Erasmus. Gyorgy Faludy. Stein and Day. 1970.

Luther was guilty of two crimes–he struck the Pope in his crown, and the monks in their belly.
Erasmus, Desiderius. Colloquies. Trans. Craig R. Thompson. University of Toronto Press. 1997.

A nail is driven out by another nail, habit is overcome by habit..
Erasmus, Desiderius. Diluculum. Trans. Nathan Bailey. Reeves and Turner. 1878.

It is the worst of madness to learn what has to be unlearnt.
Erasmus, Desiderius. De ratione studii. University of Illinois Press.1944.