Faculty Overview

The following lists includes lecturers, guest professors and core faculty members of European Graduate School who were invited or lectured at least once at European Graduate School. As such the list constitutes not a listing of current faculty members, but an archive of personal and academic associations. The current curriculum can be found at the corresponding pages of the Media and Communication division of European Graduate School.

  • Giorgio Agamben, Phd., Baruch Spinoza Chair at European Graduate School EGS, is a professor of aesthetics at the University of Verona, Italy and teaches philosophy at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris and at the University of Macerata in Italy. As a post graduate he participated in seminars with Martin Heidegger in Freiburg and directed the Italian Walter Benjamin Edition. Agamben's unique blending of literary theory, continental philosophy, political thought, religious studies, literature and art makes him one of the most challenging thinkers of our time. He was a visiting professor in Paris and has taught at American universities such as UC Berkeley, Los Angeles, Irvine, Santa Cruz, and Northwestern.

  • Pierre Alféri is a French novelist, poet, and essayist, born in 1963 in France, and currently living in Paris. He earned a degree in Philosophy at the University of Paris and published his thesis on William of Ockham (Guillaume d'Ockham) in 1989. In 1991, he published another philosophical essay on questions of language and literature, Chercher une phrase. Nevertheless, Alféri did not pursue an academic career in philosophy; instead, he became one of the most innovative French poets of today. He has since published several books of poetry, including Les Allures naturelles (1991), Le Chemin familier du poisson combatif (1992), Kub Or (1994), Sentimentale journée (1997), La Voie des airs (2004) as well as the novels Fmn (1994) and Le cinéma des familles (1999), and most recently Les Jumelles (2009).

  • Hubertus von Amelunxen, Ph.D., is a theorist, curator and artist. He holds the Walter Benjamin Chair at the European Graduate School (EGS) where he teaches Media Philosophy and Cultural Studies. He was born on December 29, 1958 in a town called Bad Hindelang in Bavaria, Germany. He studied Romance Languages and Literature (French, Spanish), German, and Art History in Marburg (Philipps-Universität) and Paris (École Normale Supérieure) and finished his Ph.D. at the University of Mannheim with a thesis on 19th century French literature (Allegory and Photography). Professor von Amelunxen was a Founding Director and Professor at the International School for New Media in Lübeck (Germany). Additionally, he is a Senior Visiting Curator for Photography and New Media at the Canadian Center for Architecture in Montreal (Canada).

  • Andrasek is a co-curator of the PROTO/E/CO/LOCICS Symposium series in Rovinj Croatia. She lectured and published her writings worldwide. Andrasek was born in Croatia and presently lives and works in London.

  • Alain Badiou, Ph.D., born in Rabat, Morocco in 1937, holds the Rene Descartes Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. Alain Badiou was a student at the École Normale Supérieure in the 1950s. He taught at the University of Paris VIII (Vincennes-Saint Denis) from 1969 until 1999, when he returned to ENS as the Chair of the philosophy department. He continues to teach a popular seminar at the Collège International de Philosophie, on topics ranging from the great 'antiphilosophers' (Saint-Paul, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Lacan) to the major conceptual innovations of the twentieth century. Much of Badiou's life has been shaped by his dedication to the consequences of the May 1968 revolt in Paris. Long a leading member of Union des jeunesses communistes de France (marxistes-léninistes), he remains with Sylvain Lazarus and Natacha Michel at the center of L'Organisation Politique, a post-party organization concerned with direct popular intervention in a wide range of issues (including immigration, labor, and housing). He is the author of several successful novels and plays as well as more than a dozen philosophical works.

  • Nicholson Baker was born in New York City on January 7, 1957. Nicholson Baker is a Professor of Poetry at European Graduate School (EGS) and a celebrated writer of fiction and non-fiction. As a novelist, Baker's work focuses on the thoughts of characters during otherwise inconsequential moments. His novels generally de-emphasize narrative and focus instead on careful description and characterization.

  • Judith Balso, Ph.D., is a professor of poetry at the European Graduate School EGS, where she conducts an annual workshop on poetry with an established poet. Each year she brings in a different poet to talk about their work and the poetic process. Among the poets she has invited in the past are Jacques Roubaud, Alessandro De Francesco, and Philippe Beck. Judith Balso received her Ph.D. from Marc Bloch University, Strasbourg in 1997. She currently teaches at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris and at the European Graduate School EGS.

  • Jason Barker, Ph.D., born in London in 1971, is a theorist, director, screenwriter and producer. He was educated at the Surrey Institute of Art and Design where he graduated with a degree in media studies in 1995, and at Cardiff University where he studied philosophy under Distinguished Research Professor Christopher Norris, gaining his Ph.D. in 2003. The relation of theory to leftist politics has been Jason's guiding intellectual preoccupation to date, informing the publication, in 2002, of his Alain Badiou: A Critical Introduction (London: Pluto Press), the first book-length study of Badiou's philosophy to appear in any language. In the words of Alain Badiou himself, the book provides the "best account of my work's political trajectory". Jason is also the English translator of Badiou's Metapolitics.

  • Jean Baudrillard, Ph.D., French sociologist, cultural critic, and theorist of postmodernity, was born July 27, 1929 in the northern town of Reims. The son of civil servants and the grandson of peasant farmers, Jean Baudrillard was the first in his family to attend university. Jean Baudrillard was a university sociology teacher and a leading intellectual figure of his time. His early life was influenced by the Algerian war in the 1950s and 1960s. He taught German in a lycée before completing his doctoral thesis in sociology under the tuition of Henri Lefebvre. He then became an Assistant, September 1966 at Nanterre University of Paris X. He was associated with Roland Barthes, to whose semiotic analysis of culture his first book, The Object System (1968), is clearly indebted. He was also influenced by Marshall McLuhan, who demonstrated the importance of the mass media in any sociological overview. Influenced by the student revolt at Nanterre University in 1968, he cooperated with, Utopie, evidently influenced by anarcho-situationism, structural Marxism and media theory, in which he published a number of theoretical articles on the ambience of capitalist affluence, and the critique of technology. He became Mâitre-assistant at the University in 1970, and left the school in 1987. Jean Baudrillard taught at the European Graduate School EGS from its earliest period until his death on March 6, 2007.

  • Philip Beesleyis an architect, artist, and professor. He has created numerous installations that draw on his research into architectural textiles and more specifically interlinked mesh structures, exploring responsive environments and the interaction between natural and artificial systems. He runs his own firm in Toronto where he designs public and residential buildings and oversees design projects for the performing arts and exhibitions. Beesley has earned several prestigious awards, including the Ontario Lieutenant Governor’s Medal for Architecture, the Prix de Rome for Architecture, and, in 2005, the Canadian Architect Award of Excellence for the graphic design of the French River Visitor Centre. He teaches at the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo where he also co-directs the Integrated Centre for Visualization, Design and Manufacturing (ICVDM).

  • Philippe Beck, Ph.D., born in Strasbourg, France, on April 21, 1963 is a contemporary French poet, writer, and philosopher. In 1994 Philippe Beck received his Doctor of Philosophy at l’Ecole des hautes études en sciences socials in Paris under the direction of Jacques Derrida. Philippe Beck has been a Professor at The European Graduate School, in Saas-Fee, Switzerland since 2009 and a Lecturer in Philosophy at the Centre Atlantique de Philosophie at the University of Nantes since 1995. Beck’s first book of poetry, Sleeve Guard Hypocrite, (Garde-manche hypocrite) appeared in 1996.

  • Geoffrey Bennington is an American philosopher and literary critic. He was born in 1956. Geoffrey is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of French and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emory University, as well as a member of the International College of Philosophy. Geoffrey is widely known for his expertise in deconstruction and the works of Jacques Derrida and Jean-François Lyotard.

  • Benjamin H. Bratton, born 1968, is an American theorist, sociologist and professor of visual arts, contemporary social and political theory, philosophy, and design.

  • Catherine Breillat, born in Bressuire, France on July 13, 1948, is a Paris-based filmmaker and writer, and Professor of Auteur Cinema at the European Graduate School EGS. She became famous not only for her distinctively personal films on sexuality, gender trouble and sibling rivalry, but also for her best-selling novels. In her films, she takes sexuality as a subject, and not merely as an object, confronting the viewer with a female's understanding of her own sexuality. The topics range from the adolescent obsession with the loss of virginity (Une vraie jeune fille, 1975; 36 Fillette, 1988), female masochism (Romance, 1999), the seemingly unbridgeable gulf between an older woman and a younger man (Parfait amour!, 1996; Brève traversée, 2001), and female sexuality as a potent force that is being repressed and made obscene by its patriarchal bedmate. The sexual acts in Catherine Breillat's films are not only sexually explicit but very often unsimulated, earning her the unfortunate label of being the auteur of porn, obscuring the much more important reading of her work within the history of modernist filmmaking. Although much of her work focuses on women's relationship to desire, Catherine Breillat also believes that men must re-examine their own sexuality and the way it has been affected by women's social advancement.

  • Mark Burry is currently Professor of Urban Futures at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Previously he was Professor of Innovation, and Director of the Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory and Design Research Institute at RMIT, Australia, and consultant architect for the completion of Antonio Gaudi's Sagrada Famiglia church in Barcelona, Spain. He is the author of several books on digital design, including Scripting Cultures and (with Jane Burry) The New Mathematics of Architecture.

  • Judith Butler, Ph.D., Hannah Arendt Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, attended Bennington College and then Yale University, where she received her B.A., and her Ph.D. in philosophy in 1984. Her first training in philosophy took place at the synagogue in her hometown of Cleveland. She taught at Wesleyan and Johns Hopkins universities before becoming Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Eduardo Cadava, Ph.D., is a prominent contemporary American literary and philosophical critic and thinker. He joined the faculty at Princeton University in 1989. He is a Professor in the Department of English and an Associate Member of the Department of Comparative Literature, the School of Architecture, The Center for African-American Studies, The Program in Latin American Studies, and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. He also is a member of the Committee for European Cultural Studies, and of the steering committee for Princeton’s graduate Program in Media and Modernity. He teaches in the areas of literary theory, visual and cultural studies, philosophy, theories of translation, and, within the field of literature, he specializes in American literature, and also in French, German, and Latin American literature. He also is a Professor at the European Graduate School (EGS), where he teaches an intensive summer seminar.

  • Hélène Cixous was born on June 5, 1937, in Oran, Algeria. Her father was a French-colonialist, and died while Cixous was young. Her mother was Austro-German, and German was Cixous' first language. Members of her family were Jewish, including her father, and the atrocities of World War II had an early influence on her. Hélène Cixous studied English literature, especially Shakespeare, and read mythology and the German romantics including Heinrich von Kleist. From early in her life she has studied literature in many languages, reading authors like Franz Kafka, Marina Tsvetaeva, and Clarice Lispector.

  • Mark Daniel Cohen has a diverse academic background. As a high school student in 1966 he attended Columbia University's Computer Programming for Gifted High School Students program. From 1969 - 1973 he studied at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor where he graduated with Distinction obtaining a Bachelor of Arts in English. He attended Kean College in Union New Jersey from 1973 to 1974 where he obtained his teaching certification in secondary education. Mark Cohen then attended the University of Wisconsin where he was in the post-graduate English program until 1975. In 1995 Mark Cohen returned to school, obtaining his Master of Arts from NYU with a thesis titled, The Necessary Whim: The Truth of the Matter: The Correlation Between Friedrich Nietzsche's Ontology and the Philosophical Foundations of Quantam Physics. From January 1992 - May 1994 Mark Cohen took studio art courses and HTML programming courses at the School of Visual Arts in New York, NY. In 1997 Mark Cohen completed a Certificate in Multimedia Programming at New York University. In 2003 Mark began his PhD studies at the European Graduate School.

  • Rebecca Comay

  • Simon Critchley’s published work deals largely with disappointment and it’s relationship to philosophy; chiefly, religious or political disappointment. In Very Little… Almost Nothing (1997), Critchley explores religious disappointment, the loss of belief, and nihilism through Maurice Blanchot and Samuel Beckett. In this work he is simultaneously pointing to the symbiosis between disappointment and excitement, linking them as a necessity to one another. Instead of disappointment being an inescapable truth in the pejorative sense he explores it’s relationship to limitation as freedom. In an interview with the theoretical journal, Ephemera: Theory and Politics in Organization, Simon Critchley talks about disappointment as "an acceptance of limitation", in this view Critchley see's limitation in a new light, as rather a condition of possibility. Critchley cites Montaigne who says that ,"he who has learned how to die has unlearned how to be a slave". Here Critchley is pointing towards the idea that one who accepts the limiations of being a mortal being is truly free.

  • Diane Davis, Ph.D., is an American critical rhetorician and post-structuralist thinker. Diane Davis is The Kenneth Burke Chair at the European Graduate School (EGS) where she teaches an intensive seminar on Jacques Derrida. Dr. Davis studied for her Bachelors of Arts at Midwestern State University, graduating in 1986 in English and Physical Education for which she received the Magna Cum Laude distinction. Diane Davis received a Master of Arts, also with distinction, at Indiana University at Fort Wayne in 1989 where she focused on American Literature and Rhetoric. In 1995 she received her first doctorate at the University of Texas at Arlington, in Humanities—Rhetoric, Composition, and Critical Theory, with a dissertation titled “Breaking Up [at] Totality: A Rhetoric of Laughter for Politics and Pedagogy" for which she got a distinction as well. Finally, she obtained her second doctorate from EGS in 2003, receiving the highest distinction (Summa Cum Laude) for her dissertation entitled Inessential Solidarity. She would go on to publish both of her dissertations, the first one in 2000 and the second one in 2010. Professor Diane Davis qualifies her research as follows:

  • Claire Denis (b. April 21, 1948, Paris) is a Paris-based filmmaker and one of the major artistic voices of contemporary French cinema. After a disappointing experience of studying economics, Claire Denis enrolled in the Institut des Hautes Études Cinématographiques (now École Nationale Supérieure des Métiers de l'Image et du Son) where she graduated in 1971. At the beginning of her film career, she worked as an assistant director to Dušan Makavejev, Costa Gavras, Jacques Rivette, Jim Jarmusch and Wim Wenders. Claire Denis made her film debut in 1988 with Chocolat, a luminous depiction of malaise of the post-colonial world.

  • Manthia Diawara, Ph.D., is a writer, cultural theorist, film director and professor of comparative literature of Malian origin today living in the United States. He was born in 1953 in Bamako, West Africa, south of Algeria. Manthia Diawara spent his youth in Kankan, the largest city in Guinea, Africa until 1964 when his family was expelled from Guinea. Manthia Diawara first went to Graduate School in Bamako. There he was part of a group called “Rockers” and listened to James Brown, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Ike and Tina Turner. Manthia Diawara’s group was against the Vietnam war and apartheid and aligned itself with Black Power, the Black Panthers and the Black Muslims. His heroes were Angela Davis, Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali. In those days Manthia Diawara called himself J. B. (James Brown) and his best friend, Sly.

  • Georges Didi-Huberman is a French art historian who embraces the visual arts, the historiography of art, psychoanalysis, the human sciences and philosophy. Georges Didi-Huberman was born on 13 June 1953 in Saint-Étienne. He studied art history and philosophy at the Université de Lyon and received his doctoral degree at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris in 1981 under the supervision of Louis Marin.

  • Suzanne Doppelt is a renowned Paris-based contemporary writer and photographer, and currently professor of photography at the European Graduate School EGS. Suzanne Doppelt studied philosophy and became a teacher of literature and philosophy in Paris. It was during her time as a philosophy and literature teacher that she became interested in photography and decided to pursue a second career as a photographer. This decision led to a new picto-literary style in her work, which can be seen in her books Totem (2002), Quelque chose cloche (2004), La 4e des plaies vole (2004), and Le pré est vénéneux (2007). Suzanne Doppelt also works on ghosts and what the fantastic logic of their appearances and disappearances might imply for an economy of the living.

  • Anne Dufourmantelle, Ph.D., is a French psychoanalyst, philosopher and author. Anne was born in Paris in 1964, from an English/Swiss father and a French mother. As a child, Anne spent some years in Spain and later, in Central America, which turned Spanish into the language of her heart. These starting points have given Anne an inclination towards literature of exile and thinkers who could trespass frontiers of a different kind. Anne's past contributes to her uniquely non-strict "French" way of thinking.

  • Elie During is a Professor at The European Graduate School, an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris 10, Nanterre, and a seminar lecturer at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Paris (School of Fine Arts). Elie During studied philosophy at the Sorbonne and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris from 1993 to 1998. He also studied at Princeton University from 1995 to 1996. From 1998 - 1999 he worked in New York at the French Cultural Service as a "cultural attaché" for books and academic exchanges. Elie During received his Ph.D. from the University of Paris 10 in 2007 for his research on the philosophical reception of the theory of relativity ("From Relativity to Spacetime: Bergson between Einstein and Poincaré," 2007). He has since been exploring the notion of spacetime at the juncture of metaphysics, science, and aesthetics, where the durations of mind and matter appear to intersect.

  • Keller Easterling is an American architect, urbanist and theorist. She is currently Professor at Yale School of Architecture and taught previously at Columbia GSAPP. She is the author of many books, including Organization Space: Landscape, Highways, and Houses in America (2001), Enduring Innocence: Global Architecture and its Political Masquerades (2005) and Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (2014).

  • Atom Egoyan is a critically acclaimed filmmaker. He was born on July 19, 1960 in Cairo, Egypt. Atom Egoyan is a well-known and highly talented director who has made dozens of films. His films often explore the way human relationships are corrupted by the omnipresence of technology. Aside from teaching at the European Graduate School EGS, Atom Egoyan is also a faculty member of the University of Toronto. In 1999, Atom Egoyan was awarded Canada's highest civilian recognition: Officer of the Order of Canada.

  • Bracha L. Ettinger, Ph.D., is the Marcel Duchamp Chair & Professor of Psychoanalysis and Art at the European Graduate School EGS, artist, senior clinical psychologist, practising psychoanalyst, and groundbreaking theoretician working at the intersection of feminine sexuality, psychoanalysis, and aesthetics. Her approach significantly extends the work of contemporary philosophers and psychoanalysts such as Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari, and Jacques Lacan, and challenges the works of Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray.

  • Although English born, Mike Figgis grew up in Nairobi, Kenya until he was eight. He then spent the rest of his childhood in Newcastle, England. Figgis studied music in London where he played keyboard in the Gas Board, which also included a young Brian Ferry, lead singer of the critically acclaimed pop group Roxy Music. He also was a member, as a musician, of The People Show, an experimental theater company. This early experimentation in music guided his later scoring of his own films. Film making runs in Mike's family his Irish cousins are the filmmakers Jonathan Figgis and Jason Figgis who run the film production company October Eleven Pictures in Ireland. The company has won numerous awards in the industry. Also his son Arlen Figgis is a film editor and his other son Louis Figgis is a producer.

  • Alessandro De Francesco (Pisa, 1981) is an Italian poet, theoretician and artist based in Strasbourg, France. He earned a degree in Philosophy at the University of Pisa and studied philosophy and comparative literature at the Écoles Normales Supérieures of Paris and Lyon and at the Technische Universität Berlin. Trained as a musician as well, he played bass professionally, attended the Siena Jazz International Master Classes and studied composition and electronic music a.o. at IRCAM (Paris), Accademia Chigiana (Siena), Centro Musica & Arte (Florence).

  • John Hamilton Frazer is an influential architect, writer and professor. Frazer has written on architecture and intelligent computer-aided design (CAD) systems. Frazer has been a computer technology pioneer in design research, architecture, and urbanism. John Frazer is widely recognized as the father of architectural computation.

  • Christopher Fynsk, Ph.D., was born in 1952 and is the Maurice Blanchot Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, Head of the School of Language and Literature at the University of Aberdeen, and Director of the Centre for Modern Thought. Christopher Fynsk is a prolific writer and teacher. He has written numerous articles for academic journals, and he has translated works by Jacques Derrida, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, and Maurice Blanchot.

  • Heiner Goebbels (b. August 17, 1952, Neustadt/Weinstrasse) is a Frankfurt based composer and director. Not easily nestled into a strictly defined artistic category, his work decontructs the conventions of opera, theater and concert music. Often characterized as political, many of his better known works were created in close collaboration with the writer Heiner Müller. After studying music and sociology in Frankfurt, he started as a composer of 'incidental' music in the seventies, as part of the Linksradikales Blasorchester (so-called left radical brass band). In the late seventies he was part of a duo with Alfred Harth (1976–1988), and later became a member of the longstanding art rock trio Cassiber (1982–92). Parallel to this, Heiner Goebbels worked on music for theater, film and ballet.

  • Antony Gormley, born in 1950 in London, is an English installation artist and professor at the European Graduate School EGS. His work, which is in the medium of sculpture, has achieved an international exposure and esteem. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994 for his work Field for the British Isles. Antony Gormley studied art history, anthropology, and archaeology at Trinity College, Cambridge. After finishing his studies at Trinity College, he spent three years traveling in Sri Lanka and India on a personal search for knowledge of Buddhism and Asian culture. He then returned to London and concluded his studies at the Slade School of Art, University College London.

  • Peter Greenaway, Ph.D., born in Newport, Wales on April 5, 1942 and based in Amsterdam and London, is one of the great film directors of our time, an innovative curator, and a challenging philosopher of cinema. Considered to be an avant-gardist with a wide access to mainstream cinema, Peter Greenaway's unique visual language reveals a strong influence by his training as a painter, structural linguistics and philosophy. Being openly critical of the 'Hollywood' approach to filmmaking, he believes the cinema should offer much more outside its slavery of narrative. As an artist who is a believer in the subversive power of the image, Peter Greenaway expresses his critical relation to our current visual culture in different forms – from paintings and films, to television, multimedia formats, opera, and most recently VJ-ing. The result of his constant explorations of the cinematic medium is the creation of incredibly rich imagery influenced by Renaissance painting, its architecture and juxtaposition to nature exploring the limits of provocative eroticism, sexual pleasure and death.

  • Boris Groys, Ph.D., is a key contemporary German thinker and writer who lived in Russia until the early 1980s. Groys has taught at the innovative Staatliche Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe (“Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design”) in southwest Germany near the Franco-German border. Groys’ work first focused on Russian avant-garde artists as well as the different successive artistic movements of the twentieth century. Groys eventually broadened his reflection, on contemporary art, analyzing the legitimacy of works in public spaces and analysis of new media.

  • Werner Hamacher, Ph.D., born in 1948 in Germany, Emmanuel Levinas Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, is Professor of General and Comparative Literature at the University of Frankfurt, Germany, and Global Distinguished Professor at the New York University. A leading critical thinker and theorist influenced by deconstructionist theory, his work bridges literature, philosophy and politics, and is situated in the domains of both aesthetics and hermeneutics. After studying philosophy, comparative literature and religious studies at the Free University of Berlin, Werner Hamacher studied at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, where he established a significant relationship with Jacques Derrida and his work. From 1984 – 1998 he was Professor of German and the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University and is currently a guest professor at numerous universities in Europe and USA, among them Yale University, Free University of Berlin, University of Amsterdam, and École Normale Supérieure. Werner Hamacher translated and introduced the work of Jacques Lacan into German, as well as the writings of Nicolas Abraham, Paul de Man, Jorie Graham and Jean Daive.

  • Barbara Hammer is a lesbian filmmaker and widely held to be an originator of queer cinema. She was born on May 15, 1939 in Hollywood, California. A highly prolific filmmaker and videographer, Barbara Hammer has directed over eighty films and videos throughout her thirty-year career. Barbara Hammer made the world's first lesbian films in 1974 (Dyketactics) and 1976 (Women I Love). Since then she has made over three dozen films. Her most recent feature length films include Lover Other (2006) and Resisting Paradise (2003).

  • Graham Harman is Distinguished University Professor at the American University in Cairo, where he has worked since 2000. He is a founding member of the well-known Speculative Realism movement, and the chief exponent (since the late 1990’s) of object-oriented philosophy. In 2013 he was ranked by ArtReview, along with his Speculative Realist colleagues, as one of the 100 most powerful influences in the contemporary art world.

  • Michael Hardt, Ph.D., born in Washington DC in 1960, is a political philosopher and literary theorist currently based at Duke University, North Carolina. While pursuing an undergraduate degree in engineering, Michael Hardt worked for solar energy companies in the United States and Italy. After college, in the early 1980s he became a part of the Sanctuary Movement, which helped refugees from Guatemala and El Salvador enter and stay in the United States with the aim of contesting the US funded wars. In the mid-1980s he became interested in radical Italian politics, met Antonio Negri, and began working together with him.

  • Martin Hielscher, Ph.D., is a world renowned author, critic and translator. Martin was born 1957 in Hamburg, Germany. Martin Hielscher holds the Theodor W. Adorno Chair at the European Graduate School (EGS) and is the Dean of Media and Communications Division. Martin is a Munich-based translator, critic, editor and author. He has lectured internationally on modern German and foreign literature and philosophy. His work is influenced by the philosophy of such figures as; Martin Heidegger, Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer. Martin Hielscher's research investigates the crossroads between contemporary and historical currents of critical theory, media philosophy and creative writing.

  • Brian Holmes, Ph.D., is an art critic, activist and translator, living in Paris, interested primarily in the intersections of artistic and political practice. He holds a doctorate in Romance Languages and Literatures from the University of California at Berkeley. Brian Homes was the English editor of publications for Documenta X, Kassel, Germany since 1997. Brian was a member of the graphic arts group 'Ne pas plier' from 1999 to 2001, and has recently worked with the French conceptual art group 'Bureau d'Études' .

  • He has been awarded the Moshe Safdie Research Fellowship, and the Martin Family Society Fellow for Sustainability at MIT. He won the History Channel and Infiniti Excellence Award for the City of the Future. His project, Fab Tree Hab, has been exhibited at MoMA and widely published. He was selected to be the Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair in Architectural Design at the University of Toronto for 2009-2010. Mitchell has also won the TED2010 Fellowship.

  • Tom Kalin, born in Chicago in 1962, is a New York-based filmmaker, writer, producer and activist, well known as a prominent figure in the New Queer Cinema. Tom Kalin received a BFA in painting (University of Illinois, 1984), an MFA in Photography and Video (Art Institute of Chicago, 1987), and completed the Independent Study Program (Whitney Museum, 1988). In addition to his feature films Swoon (1992) and Savage Grace (2007), Tom Kalin has also created short films and video works screened in numerous international film festivals and included in the permanent collections of Centre George Pompidou, Paris and MOMA, New York. He was a founding member of AIDS activist collective Gran Fury, known for its provocative public art projects, which received The Brendan Gill Prize in 1989 and was included in the Venice Biennial in 1991. His works traverse diverse forms and genres, taking inspiration from literary sources and addressing contemporary issues such as displacement, urban isolation, and homophobia. Tom Kalin focuses on the portrayal of gay sexuality and has done a significant work in changing the public opinion of AIDS, simultaneously expanding the definition of activist video. Tom Kalin was a visiting lecturer at Brown University (1994) and Yale University (1996), and since 1997 he is the Associate Professor at the Film Division at Columbia University.

  • Rem Koolhaas is a Dutch architect, theorist and urbanist. He is the founding partner of Office for Metropolitan Architecture, and its research think tank AMO, and Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He is regarded as one of the leading architects in the world, and was awarded the prestigious Pritzker Prize in 2000. Alongside his architectural practice and teaching, Koolhaas has also published a series of highly influential books, including, Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan (1978), S, M, L, XL (1995), and Content (2004).

  • Chris Kraus is a Los Angeles based author and filmmaker. Kraus received her BA from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.  She teaches creative writing at UC San Diego and teaches at the European Graduate School. Chris Kraus is well known for her role as an influential film and video maker in the New York Downtown scene of the mid eighties. Since 1990, she has directed the Native Agents new fiction series for the visionary independent press Semiotext(e), publishing such overlooked writers as Kathy Acker, Barbara Barg, Fanny Howe and Eileen Myles. Kraus’ firm attention to specifically women writers is responsible for Semiotext(e), Native Agents Imprint to be a platform for groundbreaking avant-garde work. She was nominated for the 2005 Frank Mather Prize in Art Criticism and is presently the Writer in Residence at Colombia College of Art in Chicago. Writer and filmmaker, Chris Kraus has explored a variety of different subjects ranging from feminism, gender politics, sex workers, philosophy and love.  Her publications include Trick (2009), Catt: Her Killer (2009), Visualizing the Tragic: Drama, Myth, and Ritual in Greek Art and Literature (2007), David Wojnarowicz: A Definitive History of Five or Six Years on the Lower East Side (2006), LA Artland: Contemporary Art From Los Angeles (2005), Torpor (2006), Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness (2004), Hatred of Capitalism: A Semiotext(e) Reader (2001), Aliens and Anorexia (2000), More & Less (1999) and I Love Dick (1997).

  • Vinca Kruk is a partner at Metahaven, a studio for design and research, founded by Vinca Kruk and Daniel van der Velden. Metahaven's work—both commissioned and self-directed—reflects political and social issues in collaboratively produced graphic design objects. Kruk has been teaching at ArtEZ Academy of Arts in Arhem, Otis College for Art and Design, Los Angeles, Design Academy, Valence Academy of Arts, France, HfK Bremen, HEAD – University of the Arts Geneva, Merz Akademie, Stuttgart and UniBz Bozen, Italy.

  • Sanford Kwinter is a Canadian-born architectural writer and theorist. He is currently a Professor at the Angewandte University of Applied Arts, Vienna, and Pratt Institute, New York. Previously he held academic positions at Rice University and Harvard University GSD. He is the founder of Zone Books, and the author of Architectures of Time: Towards a Theory of the Event in Modernist Culture (2001), Far from Equilibrium: Essays on Technology and Design Culture (2008) and Requiem: For the City at the End of the Millennium (2010).

  • Manuel De Landa (b. in Mexico City, 1952), based in New York since 1975, is a philosopher, media artist, programmer and software designer. After studying art in the 1970s, he became known as an independent filmmaker making underground 8mm and 16mm films inspired by critical theory and philosophy. In the 1980s, Manuel De Landa focused on programing, writing computer software, and computer art. After being introduced to the work of Gilles Deleuze, he saw new creative potential in philosophical texts, becoming one of the representatives of the 'new materialism'.

  • Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek, Ph.D., is a Polish utilitarian philosopher and lecturer at the Institute of Philosophy at Lodz University in Poland where she also completed her dissertation. Professor Lazari-Radek also teaches an intensive summer seminar on utilitarian ethics at the European Graduate School (EGS) together with the famous applied ethics philosopher, also one of the animal rights founder, Peter Singer. She would do two Master’s degrees, also at Lodz University, one in English Literature (2000) and one in Philosophy (2001). Lazari-Radek’s doctoral dissertation (2007) examined the work of the utilitarian English philosopher and economist Henry Sidgwick (1838-1900), whose work on work has had a lasting impact, especially in economics. Her dissertation was entitled Good and Reason in the Moral Philosophy of Henry Sidgwick (2007).

  • Neil Leach is an architect and theorist. He is currently Adjunct Professor at the University of Southern California, Visiting Professor at Tongji University and a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts Fellow. He has also taught at SCI-Arc, Architectural Association, Cornell University, Columbia GSAPP, Dessau Institute of Architecture, Royal Danish School of Fine Arts, IaaC, ESARQ, University of Bath, University of Brighton, University of Nottingham and London Consortium. He holds a MA in Architecture and a Diploma of Architecture from the University of Cambridge, and a PhD in Architectural Theory from the University of Nottingham.

  • Sylvère Lotringer, Ph.D., born in Paris in 1938, is Jean Baudrillard Chair at the European Graduate School EGS and Professor Emeritus of French literature and philosophy at Columbia University. He is based in New York and Baja, California. Sylvère Lotringer is a literary critic and cultural theorist, and as general editor of Semiotext(e) and Foreign Agents book series was instrumental in introducing French theory to the United States. His interests range from philosophy, literature and art to architecture, anthropology, semiotics, avant-garde movements, structuralism and post-structuralism. Sylvère Lotringer studied at the Sorbonne and received his doctorate from the École Pratique des Hautes Études VIe section in Paris in 1967 before moving to New York in the early 1970s. Among the books Sylvère Lotringer has published, he has co-written with Paul Virilio: Pure War (1983), Crepuscular Dawn (2002), and The Accident of Art (2005), and with Jean Baudrillard: Forget Foucault (1986), Oublier Artaud (2005), and The Conspiracy of Art (2005). Sylvère Lotringer has also written extensively on Georges Bataille, Simone Weil, L. F. Céline, Marguerite Duras, and Robert Antelme, and is the author of Antonin Artaud (1990), French Theory in America (2001), Hatred of Capitalism (2002), David Wojnarowicz (2006), and Overexposed (2007). Silvère Lotringer frequently lectures on art and has published catalogue essays for the MOMA, the Guggenheim Museum, the Musee du Jeu de Paume, Modern Kunst and has edited numerous magazines and books such as Philosopher-Artist (1986), Foreign Agent: Kunst in den Zeiten der Theorie (1991), and Nancy Spero (1995).

  • Geert Lovink, Ph.D., is a Dutch/Australian media theorist and innovative philosopher. Geert was born during the year of 1959 in Amsterdam. He is the Research Professor of Interactive Media at the Hogeschool van Amsterdam (HvA) and an Associate Professor of New Media at the University of Amsterdam (UvA). Geert Lovink earned his master's degree in political science at the University of Amsterdam, and he holds a Ph.D. from the University of Melbourne on the Dynamics of Critical Internet Culture. After a postdoctoral position at the University of Queensland he became the founding director of the Institute of Network Cultures in Amsterdam.

  • Catherine Malabou, Ph.D., is an important contemporary French philosopher. Catherine Malabou was born in 1959 and is a former student at the École normal supérieure (ENS) of Fontenay-Saint-Cloud in Lyon, France. ENS schools are regarded as some of the most prestigious French schools for humanities studies. Before that Catherine Malabou was educated in Paris at the renown Sorbonne University.

  • Terrence Malick is the writer/director of Badlands, Days of Heaven, The Thin Red Line, The New World, The Tree of Life, and To the Wonder. He was born in Ottawa, Illinois and grew up in Texas and Oklahoma.

  • Lev Manovich, Ph.D., was born in Moscow in 1960 and based in New York since 1981, is an artist and one of the leading theorists of digital culture and media art. Lev Manovich frequently lectures on new media internationally and has published more than ninety influential articles on new media aesthetics. His book The Language of New Media (2001) is considered by many to be placing new media 'within the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan' (Telepolis).

  • Elissa Marder, Ph.D., born January 1st 1970, is Chair of the French and Italian Departments, Professor of French and Comparative Literature and formally affiliated with the Departments of Philosophy and Women Studies at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Between 2001 and 2006 she was the Director of the Emory Psychoanalytic Studies Program for which she was also a founding member. She is a member of the Executive Committee of SIPP&ISSP (International Society of Philosophy and Psychoanalysis) and has been an International Fellow of the London Graduate School since its inception in 2010.

  • Clem Marshall, Ph.D., is a Canadian educator and writer whose focus is race, language, culture, and ancestry. Marshall is president of MangaCom Inc. where he offers a range of services aimed at improving equity in education, organizational change and the arts. Importantly, Marshall teaches an intensive media philosophy summer seminar at the European Graduate School where he also received his doctorate in 2011.

  • Colum McCann, M.A., (b. 1965 in Dublin) is a professor of contemporary literature and writer-in-residence at the European Graduate School EGS. The Irish award-winning author is based in New York where he teaches creative writing at City University of New York's Hunter College. Following in the tradition of groundbreaking Irish writers, McCann has been recognized not only by his own country which has deemed him highest literary honors with induction into Aosdana in May 2009 (paralleled only by the Irish Academy in its esteem), but by international institutions of literary merit as well. In France he not only has been awarded the Deauxville Festival of Cinema Literary Prize (also 2009) but has been granted the French Chevalier des arts et lettres from the French government, an award received by very few foreign writers of which include Salman Rushdie and Julian Barnes. In the United States his acclaim crosses all levels of media. Not only has McCann been awarded the National Book Award in 2009 for Let the Great World Spin but has been hailed by such media sunspots as Oprah Winfrey.

  • Achim Menges was in born 1975. Menges studied at the Technical University of Darmstadt in Germany. Menges graduated with Honors in 2002 from The Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA) in London where he would one day be Studio Master of the Emergent Technologies and Design Master Programme. There menges was also Unit Master of Diploma Unit 4 from 2003 to 2006. After that Menges was a visiting professor at Rice University School of Architecture in Houston, Texas. Since November 2005 Menges has been a professor in Germany at the Hochschule für Gestaltung Offenbach (“Offenbach University of Art and Design”) in Form Generation and Materialisation Processes. Since 2008 Menges has also been a professor at Stuttgart University where he founded the Institute for Computational Design (ICD) and is its director.

  • Jean-Luc Nancy, Ph.D., Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, was born on the 26th of July, 1940 in Caudéran, near Bordeaux in France. His first philosophical interests were formed during his youth in the Catholic environment of Bergerac. Shortly after he graduated in 1962 with a degree in philosophy, Jean-Luc Nancy began to publish. From the beginning his work is marked by diverse influences, from Georges Bataille and Maurice Blanchot to René Descartes, G.W.F. Hegel, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Heidegger. The influence of these thinkers is already evident in the very first books that Jean-Luc Nancy published: Le discours de la syncope (1976) and L'impératif catégorique (1983) on Immanuel Kant, La remarque spéculative (translated as The Speculative Remark, 2001) on Hegel, Ego sum (1979) on René Descartes and Le partage des voix (1982) on Martin Heidegger. After his aggregate in philosophy in Paris and a short period as a teacher in Colmar, Jean-Luc Nancy became an assistant at the Institut de Philosophie in Strasbourg in 1968. In 1973, he obtained his Ph.D. under the supervision of Paul Ricoeur, with a dissertation on Kant. Soon after, he became the 'maître de conférences' at the Université des Sciences Humaines in Strasbourg, the institute to which he is still attached. In the seventies and eighties he was a guest professor at the most diverse universities, from the Freie Universität in Berlin to the University of California. As a professor in philosophy, he was also involved in many cultural delegations of the French ministry of external affairs, particularly in relation to Eastern Europe, Great Britain and the United States of America. Together with his ever-growing publication list, this began to earn Jean-Luc Nancy an international reputation. The quick translation of his work into several languages enhanced his fame (Jean-Luc Nancy mastered, besides his mother tongue, German, Italian and English).

  • François Noudelmann, Ph.D., is a French philosopher, radio producer at the famous France Culture and professor. He is a renowned Jean-Paul Sartre (1905 - 1980) scholar and he wrote his doctoral dissertation on the role of the image in Sartre’s philosophical thought. Noudelmann has been a professor at several universities. He is based in the French literature department at the University of Paris VIII, most famous as Université de Vincennes, which it is noteworthy to point out was founded a direct result of the famous May 1968 student protests. Prestigious thinkers such as Hélène Cixous (1937 - ), Gilles Deleuze (1925 - 1995), Michel Foucault (1926 - 1984), Jean-François Lyotard (1924 - 1998) and Frank Popper (1918 - ) would be involved in its inception. There philosophy would be taught with a commitment to against traditional academy by being open to the immediate social and political aspects of our time. Additionally, teachers and students are seen more as collaborators. Noudelmann has also taught at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee (Switzerland) where he conducted an intensive summer seminar. Additionally, he has also regularly taught in the United States at both Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore as well as New York University. As an author François Noudelmann has written several books on the fiction of time, which study genealogical representations through philosophical and literary essays.

  • Mathieu Potte-Bonneville, Ph.D., is a contemporary French philosopher. Potte-Bonneville is a specialist of the work of the French philosopher of power, historian of systems of thought, Michel Foucault (1926-1984). Potte-Bonneville is one of the directors of Portail Michel Foucault Archives (“Michel Foucault Archives Portal”), which offers online digital records and bibliography about this critical thinker. Potte-Bonneville was the President of the Assemblée collégiale du Collège international de philosophie (“Assembly of the International College of Philosophy”) from 2010 to 2013. Potte-Bonneville is a lecturer at the École Normale Supérieure in Lyon, which is one of the prestigious French schools for humanities studies. Additionally, Mathieu Potte-Bonneville was a professor of philosophy at the Jean Jaurès College in Montreuil in the suburbs of Paris until the end of 2011. Potte-Bonneville also teaches an intensive media philosophy summer seminar at the European Graduate School.

  • Peter Price, Ph.D., is a critical media theorist as well as a composer, electronic musician, and digital artist. Price is co-director of thefidget space, a platform for his collaborative work with choreographer and wife Megan Bridge. The project is based in Philadelphia as a research laboratory for new forms of art, performance and media. Peter Price completed his doctorate at The European Graduate School (EGS) in Switzerland. Today Price teaches an intensive summer seminar there.

  • Brothers Stephen Quay and Timothy Quay are esteemed filmmakers, film directors and animators. They are identical twins most famously known as both either Brothers Quay or the Quay Brothers. Indeed their collaborative stop-motion animations are extremely well known for the ways in which they have been influential to the field. They were born on June 17, 1947 in Norristown, Pennsylvania, a town that had an important European immigrant influx, which surely helped in sparking the two brother’s interest in European culture in general, but especially that of Easter Europe in particular. They attended art school together at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, USA and at the Royal College of Art in London, UK in the late 1960s where they would set their studio and where they still live today as well. They are both professors of Animated Film at The European Graduate School where they have taught an intensive summer seminar, typically in the form of a workshop.

  • Jacques Rancière (b. 1940 in Algiers) is Professor Emeritus at the Université de Paris (St. Denis). He first came to prominence under the tutelage of Louis Althusser when he co-authored with his mentor Reading Capital (1968). After the calamitous events of May 1968 however, he broke with Louis Althusser over his teacher's reluctance to allow for spontaneous resistance within the revolution. Jacques Rancière is known for his sometimes remote position in contemporary French thought; operating from the humble motto that the cobbler and the university dean are equally intelligent, Jacques Rancière has freely compared the works of such known luminaries as Plato, Aristotle, Gilles Deleuze and others with relatively unknown thinkers like Joseph Jacototy and Gabriel Gauny.

  • Laurence Arthur Rickels, Ph.D., is a theorist, psychotherapist and professor. Larry Rickels was born on the December 2, 1954 in Cherokee, Iowa. Professor Rickels did his B.A. in English Literature at the University of Pennsylvania, which he finished in 1975. Very early in his career in 1972, Laurence Rickels received Second Place for the Morton Prize for his work on inhibited mourning as a pathogenic force in Nazi concentration camp survivors. This was the result of an independent study he did just south of Princeton at The Lawrenceville School. During the time Rickels was enrolled at the UPenn he spent over a year in Germany at the Free University of Berlin. There he succeeded in 1973 at taking the admission exam for graduate studies in German literature. In 1980 he completed his Ph.D. also in German Literature and in German studies but back in the US at Princeton University. After that Rickels did a Masters degree in the 1990s in Clinical Psychology at Antioch University Santa Barbara and did his residency as a psychotherapist in the same city as well. Dr. Rickels was trained by the psychoanalyst Lawton Smith.

  • Denise Riley, Ph.D., is a critically acclaimed writer of in the fields of both philosophy and poetry. She is a professor of literature and philosophy, as well as a poet. She was born in the United Kingdom in Carlisle, in 1948. 

  • François Roche is a French architect and theorist, and Visiting Professor at Columbia GSAPP. He has also taught at the Bartlett, TU Vienna, ESARQ, ESA, USC, UPenn, Angewandte and RMIT. Roche has been associated with a number of progressive practices over the years, including R&Sie(n) (since 1993), and eIf/bʌt/c (since 2011), based in Bangkok and Paris. He has published a number of books about his work, and was guest editor of Log #25.

  • Avital Ronell, Ph.D., was born in Prague. Her parents were Israeli diplomats who returned to Israel before going to New York. Avital Ronell studied at the Hermeneutics Institute in Berlin with Jacob Taubes, ultimately earned her doctorate at Princeton University, and then worked with Jacques Derrida and Hélène Cixous in Paris. She was professor of comparative literature and theory at the University of California at Berkeley for several years before eventually returning to New York, where she currently is chair of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literature and teaches German and comparative literature and theory – in addition to her yearly Fall semester seminar about Derrida – and where she continues to churn out a breathtaking range of deconstructive rereadings of everything from technology, the Gulf War, and AIDS, to opera, addiction, and stupidity.

  • Wolfgang Schirmacher, Ph.D., is a continental philosopher, professor of philosophy and founder of the pioneering Media and Communications Division at the European Graduate School (EGS). As conceived by Professor Schirmacher, the Division brings together master’s and doctoral students to work with some of the most prominent visionaries and philosophers of the world today. An enigmatic and inspirational professor, Wolfgang Schirmacher believes in the potential of every new philosopher to alter the course of philosophy and history. An internationally renowned Arthur Schopenhauer scholar, he is the President of the International Schopenhauer Association. Not surprisingly, Dr. Schirmacher is also the Arthur Schopenhauer Chair at EGS. Wolfgang Schirmacher was born in 1944 in Germany.

  • Volker Schlöndorff is an acclaimed movie director based in Berlin and a professor of film and literature at the European Graduate School (EGS) in Saas-Fee, Switzerland since 2001. Volker Schlöndorff was born on March 31, 1939 in Wiesbaden, Germany. He grew up in Schlangenbad and attended high school near his birthplace, located in the low mountain range region of Taunus, in the state of Hesse. In 1955 he started his studies in France, first going to a liberal Jesuit boarding school in Morbihan in the region of Brittany, and after went to school in Paris at the elite school “Lycée Henri IV” in the Latin Quarter where he got his Baccalauréat (high school diploma). He then studied at the Sorbonne, another prestigious institution, where he studied political science and economics. However, in those days he used to go up to three times a day to the Cinémathèque française (a reputable French film library), which makes available one of the largest archives in the world of films, movie documents and documentaries. There he had the opportunity to meet many of the Nouvelle Vague directors (French New Wave), which was not only famous for rejecting traditional forms of cinema but for doing so with a youthful critical look.

  • Michael Schmidt, Ph.D., (University of Freiburg), John Cage Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, studied piano and did his doctoral work in musicology. He is currently the coordinator of Classical Music Online with Bavarian Radio Station, Munich, and teaches 'Strategies for the Media Future of Music' at the Ludwigs Maximilian Universität in Munich and at the Universities of Music in Munich and Karlsruhe (Germany). Michael Schmidt is the author of Ekstase als musikalisches Symbol, Hat Musik ein Geschlecht?, Zukunftsmusik für Kulturwellen, Capriccio für Siegfried Palm, Philosophy of Media Sounds, Von der Interpretation zur Simulation, Die Pornographie der schönen Stellen, Polyphony of the Beautiful Channels, Terror Aestheticized and the Technique of Music, Music as Media, Musical Expression and Digital Media, and Musical Fusion in the Age of Media. Michael Schmidt is a member of the selection committee of the Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation, Berlin, and head of the board of trustees of the Georg-von-Vollmar-Academy, Munich.

  • Patrik Schumacher is a Professor at The European Graduate School and a partner at Zaha Hadid Architects. He is founding director at the AA Design Research Lab. Patrik joined Zaha Hadid in 1988. Patrik Schumacher has co-authored many key projects, a.o. MAXXI – the National Italian Museum for Art and Architecture of the 21st century in Rome. He won the Royal Institute of British Architects’ Stirling Prize for excellence in architecture in 2010.

  • Peter Albert David Singer, B.Phil. (graduate degree in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, England), is a renown Australian-born Jewish philosopher born on July 6th 1946. For over thirty years he has challenged traditional notions of applied ethics. He is world famous for giving the impetus to the animal rights movement. Today he holds the chair of ethics at Princeton University. Singer has also held twice the chair of philosophy in his native land at Monash University where he also founded the Centre for Human Bioethics. Peter Singer is a rationalist philosopher in the Anglo-American tradition of utilitarianism. He teaches “practical ethics”, which he defines as the application of a morality to practical problems based on philosophical thinking rather than on religious beliefs. In 2009 Singer would make it to the Time magazine list of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World”.

  • Paul D. Miller, also most famously known as ‘DJ Spooky, That Subliminal Kid’, which is his stage name and self constructed persona, is an experimental and electronic hip-hop musician, conceptual artist, and writer. He was born in 1970 in Washington DC but has been based in New York City for many years. He is the son of one of Howard University's former Deans of Law who died when he was only three, and a mother who was in charge of a fabric shop of international repute. Paul Miller then spent the main part of his childhood in Washington DC’s nurturing bohemia. Paul Miller is a Professor at the European Graduate School (EGS) where he teaches Music Mediated Art. DJ Spooky is known amongst other things for his electronic experimentations in music known as both “illbient” and “trip hop.” His first album, Dead Dreamer, was released in 1996 and he has since then released over a dozen albums. He was the first editor of Artbyte: The Magazine of Digital Arts, which has since ceased publication. Miller’s articles have widely been published in, for example, The Source, The Village Voice, Artforum, Paper Magazine, Rap Pages, and many other magazines and journals.

  • Bruce Sterling is an Austin-born (April 14th 1954) science fiction writer and Net critic, internationally recognized as a cyberspace theorist who is also still based there. However, as a child he also spent a lot of time in India, which can partly explain why today still Sterling is fond of Bollywood movies. Sterling studied journalism. He published his first book, Involution Ocean, in 1977. However, he first started becoming famous in Austin by organizing every year a Christmas party where he would present digital art. In the 80s Sterling published Cheap Truth a series of fanzines, which are magazines for fans of a particular performer, group, or form of entertainment. He did so under the surprising but revealing pen name of Vincent Omniaveritas. In latin, “vincit omnia veritas” means “truth conquers all things”. Sterling’s writings have been very influential in the cyberpunk movement in literature, specifically the novels Heavy Weather (1994), Islands in the Net (1988), Schismatrix (1985), The Artificial Kid (1980).

  • Elia Suleiman, إيليا سليمان is a Palestinian actor and filmmaker who has extensive experience in both directing and screenwriting. He was born on July 28, 1960 in Nazareth, Palestine. Elia Suleiman is most well-known for his 2002 film, Divine Intervention, a surreal comedy and modern tragedy about the Israeli occupation of Palestine, with a specific look at daily life. Divine Intervention won several awards, including the International Critics Prize (FIPRESCI), the Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize (2002), and the Best Foreign Film Prize at the European Awards in Rome. Often compared with filmmakers Jacques Tati and Buster Keaten, Elia Suleiman deals with both burlesque and seriousness with a similar poetic sense. Speaking theoretically about his work, he links it to the project of democracy:

  • Leslie Thornton, is an American filmmaker and artist. Currently she lives and works in both New York and Rhode Island. Leslie Thornton was born in 1951 in Knoxville, Tennessee. Leslie Thornton creates vigorously experimental film and video. All her work delves into the mystery and ongoing investigations into the production, creation and distribution of meaning through and within media. One finds that with Leslie Thornton both form and content are critical and inform each other. Thornton is Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University.

  • Margarethe von Trotta is an actor, one of the foremost German film directors, a member of the New German Cinema movement, and one of the most important feminist filmmakers in the world. She was born on February 21 1942 in Berlin, Germany. Before her life-changing discovery of cinema and especially that of nouvelle vague (new wave) while on a trip to Paris, Margarethe von Trotta studied business for two years and worked in an office:

  • Luc Tuymans

  • Agnès Varda is a photographer, film director and a Paris-based key figure in modern film history and one of the world's leading filmmakers. Agnès Varda is a Professor of Film and Documentaries at the European Graduate School (EGS). She was born on May 30th, 1928 in Ixelles, Belgium, with the slightly different name of Arlette Varda. Her father is Greek and her mother is of French origins. She escaped from Belgium in 1940 to go live in Sète, France with her family where she grew up during her teenager years. Agnès Varda studied at the École du Louvre with a focus on art history and photography at the École des Beaux-Arts. She then went on to work at the Théâtre National Populaire in Paris as a photographer, which is directed by the famous French actor and filmmaker Jean Villar. In a 2009 interview, speaking about her childhood and how it relates to her career she shared the following:

  • Daniel van der Velden is a partner at Metahaven, a studio for design and research, founded by Vinca Kruk and Daniel van der Velden. Metahaven's work—both commissioned and self-directed—reflects political and social issues in collaboratively produced graphic design objects. Van der Velden is a Senior Critic at Yale University, and a Tutor at the Sandberg Instituut Amsterdam. He lectured at the University of Amsterdam, Department of Media Studies.

  • Paul Virilio (b. 1932 in Paris) is a world-renowned philosopher, urbanist, and cultural theorist. His work focuses on urban spaces and the development of technology in relation to power and speed. He is known for his coining of the term 'dromology' to explain his theory of speed and technology. Paul Virilio is of mixed ancestry, being the son of an Italian father (who identified as a Communist) and a Breton mother. As a small child in France during the Second World War, Paul Virilio was profoundly impacted by the blitzkrieg and total war; however, these early experiences shaped his understanding of the movement and speed which structures modern society. In order to escape the heavy fighting in the city, he fled with his family to the port of Nantes in 1939.

  • Victor J. Vitanza, Ph.D., is a philosopher who specializes in rhetorics. He is not only Jean-François Lyotard Chair at the European Graduate School (EGS), but also a Professor of English and Rhetoric at Clemson University. Professor Vitanza obtained his B.A. from the University of Houston in English studies in 1967. He then went on to get his M.A., also in English studies, at the University of Houston. His master’s thesis was called The Image of the Abyss in Selected Works of Edgar Allan Poe.

  • Samuel Weber, Ph.D., is an American philosopher and professor. Professor Weber is the Paul de Man Chair at the European Graduate School (EGS), the Avalon Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University, and one of the leading American thinkers across the disciplines of literary theory, philosophy, and psychoanalysis. Samuel Weber was born in New York. Samuel Weber has been a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Director of their Paris Program in Critical Theory.

  • Wim Wenders is an academy award nominated film director, writer, and photographer. Wim Wenders was born as Wilhelm Ernst Wenders in Düsseldorf, Germany in 1945 and grew up in Düsseldorf, Koblenz and surrounding areas. After two years of studying medicine and philosophy and a yearlong stay in Paris as a painter he attended the University of Television and Film in Munich from 1967 to 1970.

  • Caveh Zahedi (b. April 29, 1960) is an American film director and actor of Iranian descent. His films include I Am a Sex Addict (2005), Tripping with Caveh (2004), The World is a Classroom (2002), In the Bathtub of the World (2001), I Was Possessed by God (1999), I Don’t Hate Las Vegas Anymore (1994), A Little Stiff (1991). He appeared and acted in In the Bathtub of the World (2001), Waking Life (2001), A Sign From God (2002), Money Buys Happiness (2000), I Was Possessed By God (1999), Treasure Island (1999), Citizen Ruth (1996), I Don’t Hate Las Vegas Anymore (1994), and A Little Stiff (1991).

  • Siegfried Zielinski, Ph.D., is Michel Foucault Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. He is also the Chair of Media Theory – with a focus on Archaeology and Variantology of Media – in the Institute for Time Based Media at the Berlin University of Arts.

  • Slavoj Žižek, Ph.D., is a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and a visiting professor at a number of American Universities (Columbia, Princeton, New School for Social Research, New York University, University of Michigan). Slavoj Žižek recieved his Ph.D. in Philosophy in Ljubljana studying Psychoanalysis. He also studied at the University of Paris. Slavoj Žižek is a cultural critic and philosopher who is internationally known for his innovative interpretations of Jacques Lacan. Slavoj Žižek has been called the ‘Elvis Presley’ of philosophy as well as an 'academic rock star'. He is author of The Indivisible Remainder; The Sublime Object of Ideology; The Metastases of Enjoyment; Looking Awry: Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture; The Plague of Fantasies; and The Ticklish Subject. Slavoj Žižek's work can be characterized as vibrant, full of humor, blatant disregard for distinctions between high and low forms of culture and his work and presence has gathered him critical acclaim as a superstar in the world of contemporary theory.

  • Thomas Zummer, is an artist and lecturer at the Tyler School of Art and a visiting professor in critical studies in the Transmedia Programme at the Hogeschool Sint Lukas, Brussels, as well as visiting professor at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee. Thomas Zummer is an internationally aclaimed independent scholar and writer, as well as being an artist and curator. As an artist he has exhibited internationally since 1976, including at Exit Art, Thread Waxing Space, and The Dia Foundation in New York City as well as at the CAPC in Bordeaux and Wigmore Hall in London. With his wife, they have had a long collaboration as well with The Wooster Group, acting in many of their performances. Most recently, Zummer was artist in residence at the haudenschildGarage in La Jolla, California. In 1995 Thomas Zummer won 5th Prize in the ACA/CODA Architectural Design Competition for the City of Atlanta for the 1996 Olympics.

  • Alenka Zupančič, Ph.D., is a Lacanian philosopher and social theorist, based as a full-time researcher in the philosophy department of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. She was born in 1966 in Slovenia. Alenka received her Ph.D. from the University of Ljubljana in 1990 and currently is a member of the the Ljubljana School for Psychoanalysis. At the European Graduate School, she holds a position as a lecturer where she teaches an intensive summer seminar on Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

Please take note, that the faculty overview includes lecturers, guest professors and core faculty members of European Graduate School who were invited or lectured at least once at European Graduate School. As such the list constitutes not a listing of current faculty members, but an archive of personal and academic associations.