Faculty Overview

The following lists includes lecturers, guest professors and core faculty members of European Graduate School who were invited or lectured at least once at European Graduate School. As such the list constitutes not a listing of current faculty members, but an archive of personal and academic associations. The current curriculum can be found at the corresponding pages of the Media and Communication division of European Graduate School.

  • Giorgio Agamben, Phd., Baruch Spinoza Chair at European Graduate School EGS, is a professor of aesthetics at the University of Verona, Italy and teaches philosophy at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris and at the University of Macerata in Italy. Agamben's unique blending of literary theory, continental philosophy, political thought, religious studies, literature and art makes him one of the most challenging thinkers of our time. He was a visiting professor in Paris and taught at American universities such as UC Berkeley, Los Angeles, Irvine, Santa Cruz, and Northwestern.

  • Chantal Akerman, born June 6, 1950, is a Brussels-born and now Paris-based filmmaker, writer, actor, producer and composer, and one of the most important European directors of her generation. As a teenager, she saw Godard's Pierot le fou and realized that filmmaking could be personal and experimental. Akerman started making her own films in the late '60s and gave a new meaning to the term “independent film” as an embodiment of pure independence and creativity.

  • Pierre Alféri-Derrida is a French novelist, poet, and essayist, born in 1963 in France, and currently living in Paris. He earned a degree in Philosophy at the University of Paris and published his thesis on William of Ockham (Guillaume d'Ockham) in 1989. Since then he became one of the most innovative French poets of today. He has published several books of poetry, including Les Allures naturelles (1991), Le Chemin familier du poisson combatif (1992), Kub Or (1994), Sentimentale journée (1997), La Voie des airs (2004) as well as the novels Fmn (1994) and Le cinéma des familles (1999), and most recently Les Jumelles (2009).

  • Hubertus von Amelunxen, Ph.D., holds the Walter Benjamin Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. Prof. von Amelunxen was a Founding Director and Professor at the International School for New Media in Lübeck (Germany) and Senior Visiting Curator for Photography and New Media at the Canadian Center for Architecture in Montreal (Canada). He studied Romance Languages and Literature (French, Spanish), German, and Art History in Marburg and Paris and finished his Ph.D. at the University of Mannheim with a thesis on 19th century French literature (Allegory and Photography).

  • Michael Anker, Ph.D., is an American philosopher and professor. He was born in 1965. Professor of Philosophy at The College of New Rochelle, School of New Resources, John Cardinal O’Connor Campus in NYC. He also teaches a workshop entitled “Research for Dissertations” at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switzerland.

  • Pierre Aubenque, Ph.D., born July 23, 1929 in L'Isle-Jourdain, holds the Aristoteles Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. Pierre Aubenque is professor emeritus at the University Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV), a French philosopher and an internationally recognized authority on Western philosophy. Aubenque is a specialist in ancient Greek philosophy, in particular the philosophy of Aristotle, and he has written extensively on many of the questions surrounding Aristotle and his intellectual legacy in the history of the West. He is also the secretary general of the Institute International de Philosophie (Paris).

  • Alain Badiou, Ph.D., born in Rabat, Morocco in 1937, holds the Rene Descartes Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. Alain Badiou was a student at the École Normale Supérieure in the 1950s. He taught at the University of Paris VIII (Vincennes-Saint Denis) from 1969 until 1999, when he returned to ENS as the Chair of the philosophy department. He continues to teach a popular seminar at the Collège International de Philosophie, on topics ranging from the great 'antiphilosophers' (Saint-Paul, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Lacan) to the major conceptual innovations of the twentieth century. Much of Badiou's life has been shaped by his dedication to the consequences of the May 1968 revolt in Paris.

  • Jean-Christophe Bailly, Ph. D., born in Paris on May 3, 1949, is a French writer, poet and playwright. Bailly is an Art historian specializing in visual arts, especially paintings, as well as a director of collections and a teacher. He has taught the history of the formation of landscapes at the ENSNP (l'École nationale supérieure de la nature et du paysage) in Blois, in France since 2011. Bailly has edited Les Cahier de l’École de Blois (“The Journal of the School of Blois”) since 2003.

  • Nicholson Baker, born in New York City on January 7, 1957, is a Professor of Poetry at European Graduate School EGS and a celebrated writer of fiction and non-fiction. He studied at the Eastman School of Music and received a B.A. in philosophy from Haverford College. He lives with his family in South Berwick, Maine. As a novelist, Baker's work focuses on the thoughts of characters during otherwise inconsequential moments. His novels generally de-emphasize narrative and focus instead on careful description and characterization.

  • Judith Balso, Ph.D., is a professor of poetry at the European Graduate School EGS and at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris. Each year she brings in a different poet to talk about their work and the poetic process. Among the poets she has invited in the past are Jacques Roubaud, Alessandro De Francesco, Philippe Beck, and Nachoem Wijnberg. Judith Balso received her Ph.D. from Marc Bloch University, Strasbourg in 1997.

  • Lewis Baltz, MFA, born in Newport Beach, California on September 12, 1945, is one of the most influential photographers working today. Lewis Baltz is currently based in Paris and Venice, and since 2002 he has been a professor of photography at the European Graduate School EGS. Lewis Baltz graduated from San Francisco Art Institute (1969) and holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Claremont Graduate School (1971).

  • John Perry Barlow (b. October 3, 1947) was born and raised in Wyoming. In 1969, Barlow graduated with High Honors in Comparative Religion from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. John Perry Barlow is a former Grateful Dead lyricist and current co-founder and co-chair of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). The EFF is one of the leading nonprofit organizations dedicated to protecting 'digital freedom'. In 1997, John Perry Barlow was a Fellow at Harvard's Institute of Politics. He is currently a Berkman Fellow at the Harvard Law School.

  • Julian Barnes (BA Honours) born in Leicester, England on January 19, 1946, a prolific writer of wide renown, is author of many novels, short stories, and critical essays. Currently living and writing in London, Julian Barnes was a Guest Professor at The European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switzerland.

  • Jean Baudrillard, Ph.D., French sociologist, cultural critic, and theorist of postmodernity, was born July 27, 1929 in the northern town of Reims. The son of civil servants and the grandson of peasant farmers, Jean Baudrillard became a university sociology teacher and a leading intellectual figure of his time. His early life was influenced by the Algerian war in the 1950s and 1960s. Jean Baudrillard taught at the European Graduate School EGS from its earliest period until his death on March 6, 2007.

  • Philippe Beck, Ph.D., born in Strasbourg, France, on April 21, 1963 is a contemporary French poet, writer, and philosopher. In 1994 Philippe Beck received his Doctor of Philosophy at l’Ecole des hautes études en sciences socials in Paris under the direction of Jacques Derrida. Philippe Beck has been Professor at The European Graduate School, Saas-Fee, Switzerland since 2009 and Lecturer in Philosophy at the Centre Atlantique de Philosophie at the University of Nantes since 1995. Beck’s first book of poetry, Sleeve Guard Hypocrite, (Garde-manche hypocrite) appeared in 1996.

  • Sue de Beer, M.F.A., is a Brooklyn based American visual artist who works with multiple mediums including video, photography, sculpture and installations that explore the connections between memory, history, and architecture. She has exhibited her work internationally in venues such as MuHKA in Antwerp, Belgium; The Whitney Museum of American Art and the Brooklyn Museum in New York, USA; Kunst Werke in Berlin, Germany, and the Museum of Modern Art in Busan, South Korea.

  • Geoffrey Bennington was born in 1956. Geoffrey is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of French and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emory University, as well as a member of the International College of Philosophy. He is a literary critic and philosopher, best known as an expert on deconstruction and the works of Jacques Derrida and Jean-François Lyotard. He has translated many of Derrida's works into English.

  • Marcel Beyer (b. 23 November 1965 in Tailfingen, Württemberg) is a German poet and novelist. Marcel Beyer has been named one of the best young European novelists by the New Yorker. Two of his books, Spies (2000) and The Karnau Tapes (1997), have been translated into English. He has published many books in German including a translation of Gertrude Stein's work.

  • Yve-Alain Bois, Ph.D., born in Constantine, Algeria on April 16, 1952, holds the Roland Barthes Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. Yve-Alain Bois was the Joseph Pulitzer Professor of Modern Art and Chair, Department of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University and is currently a Professor of Art History at the Institute for Advanced Study / School of Historical Studies in Princeton.

  • Robert Bramkamp, born on May the 15th 1961 in Münster, is a German director and screenwriter and professor of German cinematography at the European Graduate School (EGS). From 1998 to 2006 he was a lecturer of film directing at the Academy of Film and Television in Potsdam in the eastern part of Germany (“Hochschule für Film und Fernsehen ‘Konrad Wolf’ Potsdam-Babelsberg”). Since 2008 he has been a professor at the College of Fine Arts in Hamburg, the largest port city of Germany situated in the northern part of the country.

  • Catherine Breillat, born in Bressuire, France on July 13, 1948, is a Paris-based filmmaker and writer, and Professor of Auteur Cinema at the European Graduate School EGS. She became famous not only for her distinctively personal films on sexuality, gender trouble and sibling rivalry, but also for her best-selling novels. In her films, she takes sexuality as a subject, and not merely as an object, confronting the viewer with a female's understanding of her own sexuality.

  • Victor Burgin (born in Sheffield, England, 1941) is Millard Professor of Fine Art, Goldsmiths College, University of London, and Professor Emeritus of History of Consciousness, University of California, Santa Cruz. Burgin studied painting at the Royal College of Art in London (1962-65) and continued his studies at Yale University (M.F.A., 1967). Victor Burgin is one of the most distinguished teaching artists of our time, whose cross-disciplinary work bridges media, culture and art.

  • Judith Butler, Ph.D., Hannah Arendt Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, attended Bennington College and then Yale University, where she received her B.A., and her Ph.D. in philosophy in 1984. Her first training in philosophy took place at the synagogue in her hometown of Cleveland. She taught at Wesleyan and Johns Hopkins universities before becoming Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Eduardo Cadava, Ph.D., is a prominent contemporary American critical thinker. Eduardo Cadava joined the faculty at Princeton University in 1989. He is a professor in the Department of English. Eduardo Cadava also teaches regularly there in the European Cultural Studies department. Additionally, he is also an Associate Member of the Department of Comparative Literature, School of Architecture, the Center for African Studies American, the program in Latin American Studies, as well as the Institute for International and Regional Studies. Eduardo Cadava’s areas of specialization are literature and culture in America, literary and political theory, comparative literature, translation theories, and the history of photography. Lastly, he is also a Professor at the European Graduate School (EGS) where he teaches an intensive summer seminar.

  • Sophie Calle (b. 1953) is a French writer, photographer, installation artist, and conceptual artist. Sophie Calle's work is distinguished by its use of arbitrary sets of constraints and evokes the French literary movement of the 1960s known as Oulipo. Her work frequently depicts human vulnerability and examines identity and intimacy. She is recognized for her detective-like ability to follow strangers and investigate their private lives. Her photographic work often includes panels of text of her own writing.

  • Hélène Cixous was born on June 5, 1937, in Oran, Algeria. Her father was a French-colonialist, and died while Cixous was young. Her mother was Austro-German, and German was Cixous' first language. Members of her family were Jewish, including her father, and the atrocities of World War II had an early influence on her. Hélène Cixous studied English literature, especially Shakespeare, and read mythology and the German romantics including Heinrich von Kleist. From early in her life she has studied literature in many languages, reading authors like Franz Kafka, Marina Tsvetayeva, and Clarice Lispector.

  • One year prior to the publication of The Book of Dead Philosophers Simon Critchley released his most comprehensive work in terms of his philosophical views, Infinitely Demanding (Verso, 2007), which discusses the contemporary state of disappointment in liberal politics. Critchley argues for anarchism as a tool for motivation in a post-Marx climate. Simon Critchley’s work covers much ground, including disappointment, deconstruction, humor, contemporary art, poetry, fashion, political theory, and authenticity. His early relationship to music and the punk scene allows for his work to be quite open and interdisciplinary.

  • Diane Davis, Ph.D., Kenneth Burke Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, is Director of the Computer, Writing, and Research Lab and Associate Professor of Rhetoric & Writing, English, and Communication Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Working at the intersections of rhetorical theory, media theory, and poststructuralist philosophy, she is recognized for her investigations into radical exposure at the level of the 'creature', the brute fact of the incarnate being’s susceptibility and vulnerability, in the face of which human reason is mostly impotent.

  • Michel Deguy, born in Paris in 1930, is a French poet and philosopher. The ability to bring together poetic practice and theoretical reflection turned Michel Deguy into a major figure on the French intellectual scene since the 1970s. Michel Deguy is currently a professor of French literature at the Universite de Paris VII (Saint-Denis), the founder and editor-in-chief of Po&sie since 1972 (Editions Belin), and the editor of Les Temps Modernes, the journal founded by Jean-Paul Sartre. He is the former president of the Collège international de philosophie and of the Maison des écrivains.

  • Claire Denis (b. April 21, 1948, Paris) is a Paris-based filmmaker and one of the major artistic voices of contemporary French cinema. After a disappointing experience of studying economics, Claire Denis enrolled in the Institut des Hautes Études Cinématographiques (now École Nationale Supérieure des Métiers de l'Image et du Son) where she graduated in 1971. At the beginning of her film career, she worked as an assistant director to Dušan Makavejev, Costa Gavras, Jacques Rivette, Jim Jarmusch and Wim Wenders. Claire Denis made her film debut in 1988 with Chocolat, a luminous depiction of malaise of the post-colonial world.

  • Jacques Derrida, Ph.D., (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was a French-Jewish philosopher, born in Algeria. He developed the critical technique known as deconstruction, and his work has been associated both with post-structuralism and postmodern philosophy. His prolific output of more than 40 published books, together with essays and public speaking, has had a significant impact upon the humanities.

  • Manthia Diawara, Ph.D., is an important writer, cultural theorist, film director and professor of comparative literature of Malian origin today living in the United States. He was born in 1953 in Bamako, West Africa, south of Algeria. Manthia Diawara spent his youth in Kankan, the largest city in Guinea, Africa until 1964 when his family was expelled from Guinea. Manthia Diawara first went to Graduate School in Bamako. There he was part of a group called “Rockers” and listened to James Brown, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Ike and Tina Turner as well as others. Manthia Diawara’s group was against the Vietnam war and apartheid but for Black Power, the Black Panthers and the Black Muslims. His heroes were African American Angela Davis, Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali. In those days Manthia Diawara called himself J. B. (James Brown) and his best friend, Sly.

  • Suzanne Doppelt is a renowned Paris-based contemporary writer and photographer, and currently professor of photography at the European Graduate School EGS. Suzanne Doppelt studied philosophy and became a teacher of literature and philosophy in Paris. It was during her time as a philosophy and literature teacher that she became interested in photography and decided to pursue a second career as a photographer. This decision led to a new picto-literary style in her work, which can be seen in her books Totem (2002), Quelque chose cloche (2004), La 4e des plaies vole (2004), and Le pré est vénéneux (2007). Suzanne Doppelt also works on ghosts and what the fantastic logic of their appearances and disappearances might imply for an economy of the living.

  • Anne Dufourmantelle, Ph.D., is a French psychoanalyst, philosopher and author. Anne was born in Paris in 1964, from an English/Swiss father and a French mother. As a child, Anne spent some years in Spain and later, in Central America, which turned Spanish into the language of her heart. These starting points have given Anne an inclination towards literature of exile and thinkers who could trespass frontiers of a different kind. Anne's past contributes to her uniquely non-strict "French" way of thinking.

  • Atom Egoyan is a critically acclaimed filmmaker. He was born on July 19, 1960 in Cairo, Egypt.. Atom Egoyan is a well-known and highly talented director who has made dozens of films. His films often explore the way human relationships are corrupted by the omnipresence of technology. Aside from teaching at the European Graduate School EGS, Atom Egoyan is also a faculty member of the University of Toronto. In 1999, Atom Egoyan was awarded Canada's highest civilian recognition: Officer of the Order of Canada.

  • Heinz Emigholz, is a German artist, writer, filmmaker and producer. Heinz Emigholz was born in 1948 near Bremen in Germany. He founded Pym Films in 1976. Heinz Emigholz has held a professorship in Experimental Filmmaking at the Universität der Künste Berlin since 1993. Heinz Emigholz co-founded the Institute for Time-based Media and the program Art and Media, at the University of Berlin.

  • Tracey Emin, Ph.D., was born in Croydon, England on July 3, 1963. She is a Professor of Confessional Art at the European Graduate School (EGS). A London-based artist, Tracey Emin has been recognized as one of the leading figures of the YBA (Young British Artists) in the 1990s. She graduated in fine arts from the Maidstone College of Art in 1986, and was awarded an MA in painting by the Royal College of Art in 1989.

  • Bracha L. Ettinger, Ph.D., is the Marcel Duchamp Chair & Professor of Psychoanalysis and Art at the European Graduate School EGS, artist, senior clinical psychologist, practising psychoanalyst, and groundbreaking theoretician working at the intersection of feminine sexuality, psychoanalysis, and aesthetics. Her approach significantly extends the work of contemporary philosophers and psychoanalysts such as Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari, and Jacques Lacan, and challenges the works of Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray.

  • Nuruddin Farah is a prominent Somalian writer. He is the author of over 10 books. Farah did his studies mostly in both India and England. He was born in 1945 in Baidoa in southern Somalia, what is currently known as the Republic of Somalia. However, he grew up in Ogaden, a province of Ethiopia near Somalia. He was the first writer to break with the Somali oral tradition, and his work, which he does in English, is translated into a dozen languages. Today still, Farah is considered one of the most important writers in Africa. He taught an intensive summer seminar at the European Graduate School (EGS).

  • Although English born, Mike Figgis grew up in Nairobi, Kenya until he was eight. He then spent the rest of his childhood in Newcastle, England. Figgis studied music in London where he played keyboard in the Gas Board, which also included a young Brian Ferry, lead singer of the critically acclaimed pop group Roxy Music. He also was a member, as a musician, of The People Show, an experimental theatre company. This early experimentation in music guided his later scoring of his own films.

  • Morgan Fisher, is an American filmmaker, artist, writer and teacher. He was born in 1942 in Washington, DC. He is well known for his unique avant-garde films which consistently push the definition of film itself. His academic pursuits make him standout amongst his peers. Morgan Fisher is one of the most influential artists in America who has had a clear and definitive influence amongst today's young artists. He is a professor at the European Graduate School and worked for many years at UCLA and the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California.

  • Alessandro De Francesco (Pisa, 1981) is an Italian poet, theoretician and sound artist based in Paris, France. He earned a degree in Philosophy at the University of Pisa and studied philosophy and comparative literature at the Écoles Normales Supérieures of Paris and Lyon and at the Technische Universität Berlin. Trained as a musician as well, he played bass professionally, attended the Siena Jazz International Master Classes and studied composition and electronic music a.o. at IRCAM (Paris), Accademia Chigiana (Siena), Centro Musica & Arte (Florence).

  • Christopher Fynsk, Ph.D., was born in 1952 and is the Maurice Blanchot Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, Head of the School of Language and Literature at the University of Aberdeen, and Director of the Centre for Modern Thought. Christopher Fynsk is a prolific writer and teacher. He has written numerous articles for academic journals, and he has translated works by Jacques Derrida, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, and Maurice Blanchot.

  • Heiner Goebbels (b. August 17, 1952, Neustadt/Weinstrasse) is a Frankfurt based composer and director. Not easily nestled into a strictly defined artistic category, his work decontructs the conventions of opera, theater and concert music. Often characterized as political, many of his better known works were created in close collaboration with the writer Heiner Müller.

  • Antony Gormley, born in 1950 in London, is an English installation artist and professor at the European Graduate School EGS. His work, which is in the medium of sculpture, has achieved an international exposure and esteem. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994 for his work Field for the British Isles. Antony Gormley studied art history, anthropology, and archaeology at Trinity College, Cambridge. After finishing his studies at Trinity College, he spent three years traveling in Sri Lanka and India on a personal search for knowledge of Buddhism and Asian culture. He then returned to London and concluded his studies at the Slade School of Art, University College London.

  • Peter Greenaway, Ph.D., born in Newport, Wales on April 5, 1942 and based in Amsterdam and London, is one of the great film directors of our time, an innovative curator, and a challenging philosopher of cinema. Considered to be an avant-gardist with a wide access to mainstream cinema, Peter Greenaway's unique visual language reveals a strong influence by his training as a painter, structural linguistics and philosophy. Being openly critical of the 'Hollywood' approach to filmmaking, he believes the cinema should offer much more outside its slavery of narrative.

  • Durs Grünbein’s work is integrally linked with his personal experiences growing up within the political turmoil of East Germany. As he commented in an interview with Der Spiegel"I was lost to the D.D.R. the moment I was born." Within his first work Grauzone morgens (1988) the reader finds one of the last testimonies to come from the ‘ghetto of a lost generation’, the generation born and raised in the utopia of communist East Germany.

  • Werner Hamacher, Ph.D., born in 1948 in Germany, Emmanuel Levinas Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, is Professor of General and Comparative Literature at the University of Frankfurt, Germany, and Global Distinguished Professor at the New York University. A leading critical thinker and theorist influenced by deconstructionist theory, his work bridges literature, philosophy and politics, and is situated in the domains of both aesthetics and hermeneutics.

  • Barbara Hammer is a lesbian filmmaker and widely held to be an originator of queer cinema. She was born on May 15, 1939 in Hollywood, California. A highly prolific filmmaker and videographer, Barbara Hammer has directed over eighty films and videos throughout her thirty-year career. Barbara Hammer made the world's first lesbian films in 1974 (Dyketactics) and 1976 (Women I Love). Since then she has made over three dozen films. Her most recent feature length films include Lover Other (2006) and Resisting Paradise (2003).

  • Donna Haraway, Ph.D., (b. 1944 in Denver) is a Professor of Feminism and Technoscience at the European Graduate School EGS and an internationally recognized feminist theorist and philosopher of science and technology. Donna Haraway's seminal work, Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature, has become the authoritative text in theorizing the politics of the post-human, the cyborg, the techno-mythological ideal and its promised utopia(s).

  • Michael Hardt, Ph.D., born in Washington DC in 1960, is a political philosopher and literary theorist currently based at Duke University, North Carolina. After graduating with a degree in engineering, Michael Hardt pursued a career working for solar energy companies in Latin America, believing that providing alternative energy for third world countries was the best way for political activism. Nevertheless, after working for various NGOs in Central America, Michael Hardt decided to move back to the United States and pursue the study of possibilities for fundamental social and political changes in his own country. He received an MA in 1986 and a Ph.D. in 1990 in comparative literature at the University of Washington.

  • Martin Hielscher, Ph.D., is a world renowned author, critic and translator. Martin was born 1957 in Hamburg, Germany. Martin Hielscher holds the Theodor W. Adorno Chair at the European Graduate School EGS and is the Dean of Media and Communication Division. Martin is a Munich-based translator, critic, editor and author. He has lectured internationally on modern German and foreign literature and philosophy. His work is influenced by philosophers such as Martin Heidegger, Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer. His main research interest lie in critical theory, media philosophy and creative writing.

  • Brian Holmes, Ph.D., is an art critic, activist and translator, living in Paris, interested primarily in the intersections of artistic and political practice. He holds a doctorate in Romance Languages and Literatures from the University of California at Berkeley. Brian Homes was the English editor of publications for Documenta X, Kassel, Germany since 1997. Brian was a member of the graphic arts group 'Ne pas plier' from 1999 to 2001, and has recently worked with the French conceptual art group 'Bureau d'Études' .

  • Michel Houellebecq, born on the French island of Réunion on February 26, 1958 and currently based in Ireland and Lanzarote, was named a 'pop star of the single generation' and is one of the most prominent French writers at the turn of the twenty-first century. Michel Houellebecq's novels, which have been translated into more than thirty languages, frequently incite critiques, debates, and even trials. Literary critics have labeled Michel Houellebecq's novels 'vulgar', 'pamphlet literature', and 'pornography'; he has been accused of obscenity, racism, misogyny and islamophobia, but what Michel Houellebecq has in fact undertaken is a fierce criticism of cynical modern society.

  • Pierre Huyghe was born in 1962 in Paris, France. Huyghe is an artist, filmmaker and philosopher who lives and works in Paris and New York, he co-taught an intensive summer workshop at EGS in 2008. He attended the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, Paris (1982-85). His works make use of the themes pleasure, adventure and celebration. Through exhibitions, films and public events Pierre Huyghe creates scenarios that explore the borders of fiction and reality. His work ranges from puppet theaters to small town parades and model amusement parks. Often filming recreated scenarios, he attempts to use the power of cinema to re-envision memory.

  • Luce Irigarary Ph.D.is a Belgian philosopher, psychoanalyst and linguist. She was born in Belgium in 1932. Luce Irigaray earned her doctoral degree in philosophy and also is a Ph.D. in linguistics. Luce Irigaray is a trained psychoanalyst who has studied under Jacques Lacan. She has been the Director of Research in Philosophy at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de Paris since 1964. She also has a private psychonalyst practice Luce Irigaray is one of the forefront feminist, postmodern, psychoanalytical theorist of our times.

  • Shelley Jackson is a San Francisco-based writer and artist known for her cross-genre experiments, including the groundbreaking hypertext Patchwork Girl (1995). Shelley Jackson is an innovator within literature and art. She is also a professor at the European Graduate School where she teaches a course in creative writing. As a media artist and writer her works deal with issues of the body, displacement, touch and desire. She is critically acclaimed and widely recognized as one of the leading innovators in hypertext.

  • He has been awarded the Moshe Safdie Research Fellowship, and the Martin Family Society Fellow for Sustainability at MIT. He won the History Channel and Infiniti Excellence Award for the City of the Future. His project, Fab Tree Hab, has been exhibited at MoMA and widely published. He was selected to be the Frank Gehry International Visiting Chair in Architectural Design at the University of Toronto for 2009-2010. Mitchell has also won the TED2010 Fellowship.

  • Tom Kalin, born in Chicago in 1962, is a New York-based filmmaker, writer, producer and activist, well known as a prominent figure in the New Queer Cinema. Tom Kalin received a BFA in painting (University of Illinois, 1984), an MFA in Photography and Video (Art Institute of Chicago, 1987), and completed the Independent Study Program (Whitney Museum, 1988). In addition to his feature films Swoon (1992) and Savage Grace (2007), Tom Kalin has also created short films and video works screened in numerous international film festivals and included in the permanent collections of Centre George Pompidou, Paris and MOMA, New York.

  • Friedrich Adolf Kittler, Ph.D., was a literary scientist and media theorist. He was born in 1943 in Rochlitz, Saxony Germany. His research and work was focused on media, history, communication, technology, and the military. Friedrich Kittler has been called the Derrida of the digital age. His innovative media theories have transformed the nature of technological scholarship and led the way in the field. Kittler was an innovative and hard to define theorist, who has pushed theoretical works of literary scholars into technological fields with unprecedented modes of critical thought. Through his unique brand of media determinism his work has influenced new generations of students across the world.

  • Chris Kraus is a Los Angeles based author and filmmaker. Kraus received her BA from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.  She teaches creative writing at UC San Diego and teaches at the European Graduate School. Chris Kraus is well known for her role as an influential film and video maker in the New York Downtown scene of the mid eighties.

  • Manuel De Landa (b. in Mexico City, 1952), based in New York since 1975, is a philosopher, media artist, programmer and software designer. After studying art in the 1970s, he became known as an independent filmmaker making underground 8mm and 16mm films inspired by critical theory and philosophy. In the 1980s, Manuel De Landa focused on programing, writing computer software, and computer art. After being introduced to the work of Gilles Deleuze, he saw new creative potential in philosophical texts, becoming one of the representatives of the 'new materialism'.

  • Claude Lanzmann, born in Bois-Colombes, France on November 27, 1925, is a Paris-based filmmaker, writer and journalist, renowned for his unprecedented 'cinematic history of the Holocaust', the 9 ½ hour documentary film SHOAH (1985). In his work, Claude Lanzmann addresses questions of Jewish identity by turning to topics such as the Holocaust, openly opposing its prevailing commodification by the film industry. Instead, he presents the past and its contradictions as fractured and unresolved, refusing to create works that are easy to digest.

  • Yang Lian (b. 1955 in Bern, Switzerland) is a Professor of Poetry at the European Graduate School EGS and an influential contemporary poet. He is known as a former member of the Misty Poets, an underground group of Chinese poets surrounding the literary magazine Jintian (Today).

  • Sylvère Lotringer, Ph.D., born in Paris in 1938, is Jean Baudrillard Chair at the European Graduate School EGS and Professor Emeritus of French literature and philosophy at Columbia University. He is based in New York and Baja, California. Sylvère Lotringer is a literary critic and cultural theorist, and as general editor of Semiotext(e) and Foreign Agents book series was instrumental in introducing French theory to the United States. His interests range from philosophy, literature and art to architecture, anthropology, semiotics, avant-garde movements, structuralism and post-structuralism. Sylvère Lotringer studied at the Sorbonne and received his doctorate from the École Pratique des Hautes Études VIe section in Paris in 1967 before moving to New York in the early 1970s.

  • Geert Lovink, Ph.D., (b. 1959 in Amsterdam) is a Dutch/Australian media theorist, Research Professor of Interactive Media at the Hogeschool van Amsterdam (HvA) and an Associate Professor of New Media at the University of Amsterdam (UvA). Geert Lovink earned his master's degree in political science at the University of Amsterdam, and he holds a Ph.D. from the University of Melbourne on the Dynamics of Critical Internet Culture. After a postdoctoral position at the University of Queensland he became the founding director of the Institute of Network Cultures in Amsterdam.

  • Greg Lynn is an architect, philosopher, and science-fiction author. Greg Lynn was born in 1964 in Ohio. Greg Lynn has been a professor of conceptual architecture at the European Graduate School EGS where he conducted an Intensive Summer Workshop. He teaches the course Architecture and Philosophy: An Exploration of the Future. Greg Lynn's architectural work, which is highly informed by his reading of philosophy, is prominent among contemporary architecture for its biomorphic style. TIME magazine has named Greg Lynn one of the top 100 innovators of the 21st century. He lives and works in Venice, California.

  • Jean-François Lyotard, Ph.D., (b. 1924 in Versailles) became one of the world's foremost philosophers, noted for his analysis of the impact of postmodernity on the human condition. A key figure in contemporary French philosophy, his interdisciplinary discourse covers a wide variety of topics including knowledge and communication; the human body; modernist and postmodern art, literature, and music; film; time and memory; space, the city, and landscape; the sublime; and the relation between aesthetics and politics.

  • Erin Manning, Ph.D., is a philosopher, visual artist and dancer, and is currently a University Research Chair at the Faculty of Fine Arts, Concordia University, Montreal. She is also a founder and director of The Sense Lab, an interdisciplinary laboratory on research, creation and an international network focusing on intersections between philosophy and art through the sensing body in motion. Erin Manning received her Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of Hawaii (2001) and has been teaching philosophy, political theory, visual studies, cultural studies, and film theory. She is a member of the editorial board for the online journal Inflexions and the author of works on movement and ephemerality, for which she frequently collaborates with Brian Massumi.

  • Lev Manovich, Ph.D., was born in Moscow in 1960 and based in New York since 1981, is an artist and one of the leading theorists of digital culture and media art. Lev Manovich frequently lectures on new media internationally and has published more than ninety influential articles on new media aesthetics. His book The Language of New Media (2001) is considered by many to be placing new media 'within the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan' (Telepolis).

  • Christian Marclay is a New York based visual artist and composer whose innovative work explores the juxtaposition between sound recording, photography, video and film. Born in California in 1955 and raised in Geneva (Switzerland). His mother was American so he held a double nationality. He studied at the Ecole Supérieure d'Art Visuel from 1977 - 1980 in Geneva, Switzerland. From 1977 - 1980 he studied sculpture at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston.

  • Laura U. Marks, Ph.D. is an American media theorist and artists. She is Dena Wosk University Professor in Art and Culture studies in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University, and a professor at the European Graduate School where she teaches an intensive summer seminar.

  • Brian Massumi, Ph.D., is a political theorist, writer and philosopher, and is currently a professor in the Department of Communication Sciences at the University of Montréal in Quebec Canada, where he directs both the Ph.D program and the Workshop in Radical Empiricism (Atelier en empirisme radical). He is well-known for his translations of several major texts in French poststructuralist theory, including Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus, Jean-François Lyotard's The Postmodern Condition, and Jacques Attali's Noise.

  • Simon McBurney, OBE, (b. 1957 in Cambridge) is an English actor, director, writer and winner of the Olivier and Tony awards. Born to an American archaeologist and an English secretary, Simon McBurney studied English literature at Cambridge University. After finishing his university degree, he went to Paris and was trained as a theater actor at the Jacques Lecoq Institute.

  • Colum McCann, M.A., (b. 1965 in Dublin) is a professor of contemporary literature and writer-in-residence at the European Graduate School EGS. The Irish award-winning author is based in New York where he teaches creative writing at Hunter College. He received his B.A. from the University of Texas. His father was a journalist and editor of a Dublin newspaper. Having grown up in a very literate household, Colum McCann was imbued with an appreciation for literature from a young age.

  • Carl Mitcham, Ph.D., is Hans Jonas Chair at the European Graduate School EGS and Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies, Colorado School of Mines. Carl Mitcham received his Ph.D. in Philosophy at Fordham University in 1988. He also holds an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Carl Mitcham is one of the leading American philosophers of technology with a focus on the ethics of science, technology and medicine.

  • Jean-Luc Nancy, Ph.D., Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, was born on the 26th of July, 1940 in Caudéran, near Bordeaux in France. His first philosophical interests were formed during his youth in the Catholic environment of Bergerac. Shortly after he graduated in 1962 with a degree in philosophy, Jean-Luc Nancy began to publish. From the beginning his work is marked by diverse influences, from Georges Bataille and Maurice Blanchot to René Descartes, G.W.F. Hegel, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Heidegger.

  • Gaspar Noé is a Franco-Argentine filmmaker. Gaspar is the son of the famous Argentine painter Luis Felipe Noé. Gaspar was born on. December 27, 1963 in Buenos Aires. Gaspar Noé and his parents fled the country in 1976. He is currently working in France. Gaspar Noé's films are known for their graphic and intensive violence, a feature that has attracted considerable controversy. Some critics have described his films as experiments which test the audience's ability to face the darker side of the human condition, which Gaspar Noé believes is the truth masked behind a hypocritical façade of normality.

  • François Noudelmann is a professor at the European Graduate School.

  • Hans Ulrich Obrist was born in Zürich in 1968. He is an international editor and curator. Since 1993 he is in charge of the programme Migrateurs at the Musee d´Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. He is the curator for Museum in progress, Vienna (since 1993), and the migratory Museum Robert Walser (1993). He is also the founder of the Nano Museum (1996), co-founder of Voti - Union of the Imaginary (1998), co-founder of Salon 3 (1998), Elephant and Castle, London, and a lecturer at the University of Lueneburg in Germany. During 1999 some of his projects are Cities on the Move V, at the Hayward Gallery, Laboratorium, Antwerpen Open and Sogni/Dreams, Fondazione Rebaudengo. Hans Ulrich Obrist lives and works in Paris, Vienna and London.

  • Ulrike Ottinger is a German filmmaker, documentarian and photographer. He was born June 6, 1942 and is a professor at the European Graduate School.

  • Klaus Ottmann has curated over forty exhibitions, most recently Wolfgang Laib: A Retrospective, which traveled to five museums in the United States and is shown at the Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany, from November 1, 2002 to January 19, 2003. Other curated exhibitions include Extreme Existence, Mark Morrisroe: My Life. Polaroids 1977–1989 Irony & Ecstasy: Contemporary American Paintings and Drawings, The Good, the Bad & the Ugly: Knowledge and Violence in Recent American Art, Kiki Smith, and Franz Erhard Walther.

  • Cornelia Parker (b. 1956 in Cheshire, England) is a London-based sculptor and installation artist. Her work is known internationally for its complex, ironical style. It is highly allusive and patterned with cultural references to cartoons, a style which she adapts to her need to capture things in the moment before they slip away and are lost to our perception. The themes which drive her work are consumerism, globalization, and the role of the mass media in contemporary life.

  • Philippe Parreno, is an accomplished artist and filmmaker. He was born in Oran, Algeria in 1964 and currently is based in Paris, France. Parreno rose to prominence in the 1990s, earning critical acclaim for his work, which employs a diversity of media including film, sculpture, performance and text. Throughout his work there is a constant questioning of the relationship of the formation of images and the modes by which the image is exhibited. Through combining previously created works and his own unique vision, the narrative structure of his work creates an interesting juxtaposition between creation and re-creation.

  • Jochen Poetter, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor of media art at European Graduate School. He was born in 1941. International critical acclaim has followed Jochen Poetter for his curatorial work. As an art theorist he most often known for his work in contemporary art. Professor Poetter is the former director of several museums, including the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Germany. He also was a director at the Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden and of the Museum Villa Stuck in Munich. Jochen Poetter is also an international teacher who has worked at the University of Münich.

  • Brothers Stephen Quay and Timothy Quay, (b. June 17, 1947 in Norristown, Pennsylvania) are identical twins whose collaborative stop-motion animations are extremely well known. They attended art school in Philadelphia and London and live and work in England. The Quay Brothers create films that are often called surreal and that usually involve inanimate objects coming to life.

  • Jacques Rancière (b. 1940 in Algiers) is Professor Emeritus at the Université de Paris (St. Denis). He first came to prominence under the tutelage of Louis Althusser when he co-authored with his mentor Reading Capital (1968). After the calamitous events of May 1968 however, he broke with Althusser over his teacher's reluctance to allow for spontaneous resistance within the revolution. Jacques Rancière is known for his sometimes remote position in contemporary French thought; operating from the humble motto that the cobbler and the university dean are equally intelligent, Jacques Rancière has freely compared the works of such known luminaries as Plato, Aristotle, Deleuze and others with relatively unknown thinkers like Joseph Jacototy and Gabriel Gauny.

  • Laurence Arthur Rickels, Ph.D., is a theorist, psychotherapist and professor. Larry Rickels was born on the December 2, 1954 in Cherokee, Iowa. Professor Rickels did his B.A. in English Literature at the University of Pennsylvania, which he finished in 1975. Very early in his career in 1972, Laurence Rickels received Second Place for the Morton Prize for his work on inhibited mourning as a pathogenic force in Nazi concentration camp survivors. This was the result of an independent study he did just south of Princeton at The Lawrenceville School. During the time Rickels was enrolled at the UPenn he spent over a year in Germany at the Free University of Berlin. There he succeeded in 1973 at taking the admission exam for graduate studies in German literature.

  • Avital Ronell, Ph.D., was born in Prague. Her parents were Israeli diplomats who returned to Israel before going to New York. Avital Ronell studied at the Hermeneutics Institute in Berlin with Jacob Taubes, ultimately earned her doctorate at Princeton University, and then worked with Jacques Derrida and Hélène Cixous in Paris. She was professor of comparative literature and theory at the University of California at Berkeley for several years before eventually returning to New York, where she currently is chair of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literature and teaches German and comparative literature and theory – in addition to her yearly Fall semester seminar about Derrida – and where she continues to churn out a breathtaking range of deconstructive rereadings of everything from technology, the Gulf War, and AIDS, to opera, addiction, and stupidity.

  • Jacques Roubaud, Ph.D., is a French poet, essayist, novelist and mathematician. Jacques Roubaud was born on December 5, 1932, in Caluire-et-Cuire, France. A prolific writer, as of September 2010 he is the author of over 20 books, many of which have been translated into English. Some of his translated publications include: Alix’s Journal (2010), The Loop (2009), The Great Fire of London (2006), The Form of the City Changes Faster, Alas, than the Human Heart (2006), and Hortense is Abducted (2000).

  • Wolfgang Schirmacher, Ph.D., is a continental philosopher, professor of philosophy and founder of the pioneering Media and Communication Division at the European Graduate School (EGS). As conceived by Professor Schirmacher, the Division brings together master’s and doctoral students to work with some of the most prominent visionaries and philosophers of the world today. An enigmatic and inspirational professor, Wolfgang Schirmacher believes in the potential of every new philosopher to alter the course of philosophy and history. An internationally renowned Arthur Schopenhauer scholar, he is the President of the International Schopenhauer Association. Not surprisingly, Dr. Schirmacher is also the Arthur Schopenhauer Chair at EGS.

  • Volker Schlöndorff is an acclaimed movie director based in Berlin and a professor of film and literature at the European Graduate School (EGS) in Saas-Fee, Switzerland since 2001. Volker Schlöndorff was born on March 31, 1939 in Wiesbaden, Germany. He grew up in Schlangenbad and attended high school near his birthplace, located in the low mountain range region of Taunus, in the state of Hesse.

  • Michael Schmidt, Ph.D., (University of Freiburg), John Cage Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, studied piano and did his doctoral work in musicology. He is currently the coordinator of Classical Music Online with Bavarian Radio Station, Munich, and teaches 'Strategies for the Media Future of Music' at the Ludwigs Maximilian Universität in Munich and at the Universities of Music in Munich and Karlsruhe (Germany).

  • Mark Schulman, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor of critical media theory at EGS. Dr. Schulman received his Ph.D. in Communications from the Union Institute in Cincinnati. Mark Schulman received a B.A. in Literature at Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio and a M.S. in Education, Instructional Systems Technology from Indiana University.

  • Michael J. Shapiro, Ph.D., is a political philosopher and critical theorist. Professor Shapiro was born on February 16, 1940. He wrote his Ph.D. at Northwestern University, graduating in 1966. Between 1968 and 1970 he taught at the University of California, Berkeley. He has also taught on exchanges at several Universities nationally and internationally. For example, he lectured at the University of Massachusetts both in 1979 and in 1986, NYU in 2002 at TSOA (Tisch School of the Arts), in Norway at the University of Norway from 1972 to 1973, and also in Italy at LdM, the Italian International Institute in Florence. Michael J. Shapiro describes his academic interests as follows:

  • Peter Albert David Singer, B.Phil. (graduate degree in Philosophy at the University of Oxford, England), is a renown Australian-born Jewish philosopher born on July 6th 1946. For over thirty years he has challenged traditional notions of applied ethics. He is world famous for giving the impetus to the animal rights movement. Today he holds the chair of ethics at Princeton University. Singer has also held twice the chair of philosophy in his native land at Monash University where he also founded the Centre for Human Bioethics. Peter Singer is a rationalist philosopher in the Anglo-American tradition of utilitarianism. He teaches “practical ethics”, which he defines as the application of a morality to practical problems based on philosophical thinking rather than on religious beliefs. In 2009 Singer would make it to the Time magazine list of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World”.

  • Hendrik Speck, international media theorist and professor of Digital Media at the University of Applied Sciences in Kaiserslautern in Germany, where he is heading the Information Architecture and Search Engine Laboratory. His work is focused on design, media and network theory, philosophy, online marketing, and social media. Professor Speck has taught and lectured at the International School of New Media, the New School for Social Research and Columbia University.

  • Paul D. Miller, also most famously known as ‘DJ Spooky, That Subliminal Kid’, which is his stage name and self constructed persona, is an experimental and electronic hip-hop musician, conceptual artist, and writer. He was born in 1970 in Washington DC but has been based in New York City for many years. He is the son of one of Howard University's former Deans of Law who died when he was only three, and a mother who was in charge of a fabric shop of international repute. Paul Miller then spent the main part of his childhood in Washington DC’s nurturing bohemia. Paul Miller is a Professor at the European Graduate School (EGS) where he teaches Music Mediated Art.

  • Bruce Sterling is an Austin-based science fiction writer and Net critic, internationally recognized as a cyberspace theorist. His writings have been very influential in the cyberpunk movement in literature, specifically the novels Heavy Weather (1994), Islands in the Net (1988), Schismatrix (1985), The Artificial Kid (1980), and Involution Ocean (1977).

  • Allucquére Rosanne (Sandy) Stone, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized Media Theorist and Artist. She was born in the late Forties in New York City, New York. Currently she is the Wolfgang Köhler Professor of New Media and Performance Studies at the European Graduate School, a professor of Digital Arts and New Media Production in the ACTLab (Advanced Communication Technologies Laboratory) part of the Radio-TV-Film department at University of Texas at Austin, and Senior Artist at the Banff Centre for the Arts in Alberta. Formerly, she has held the post of lecturer in the Departments of Communication, Sociology, and English (respectively) at the University of California, San Diego.

  • Elia Suleiman (b. July 28, 1960 in Nazareth, Palestine) is a Palestinian filmmaker whose most well known work is Divine Intervention, a surreal comedy about the Israeli occupation of Palestine. Divine Intervention won several awards, including the International Critics Prize (FIPRESCI), the Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize (2002), and the Best Foreign Film Prize at the European Awards in Rome.

  • Michael Taussig, Ph.D., (b. 1940) is an Australian-born anthropologist known for his provocative ethnographic studies and unconventional style as an academic. He studied medicine in Australia at the University of Sydney, and he earned a Ph.D. in anthropology at the London School of Economics. He is currently a professor of anthropology at Columbia University in New York.

  • Diana Thater, M.F.A., is not only a groundbreaking film, video and installation artist but also a curator, a writer, as well as a professor. She teaches an intensive summer seminar at the European Graduate School (EGS). Diana Thater, a native of San Francisco, was born in 1962. She has since relocated to Los Angeles where Diana has lived and worked for many years. In 1984 she received her B.A. from New York University in Art History. She did her M.F.A. in Pasadena, California at the Art Center College of Design, finishing it in 1990. There and in that same year she had her first solo exhibition entitled With/Out.

  • Margarethe von Trotta (b. February 21, 1942) is one of the foremost German film directors, a member of the New German Cinema movement, and one of the most important feminist filmmakers in the world. From the early 1960s, after returning from Paris to Germany where she was exposed to the films of Ingmar Bergman, Margarethe von Trotta wanted to direct film but was prevented from doing so because, in her own words, 'you couldn’t think that a woman could be a director'. Instead of pursuing directing then, she pursued acting, working closely with both Werner Fassbinder and Volker Schlöndorff, who later became her husband.

  • Friedrich (Fred) Ulfers (b. 1934) was the Dean of Media and Communication and Friedrich Nietzsche Professor at the European Graduate School EGS in Saas-Fee, Switzerland, where he taught an intensive Summer Seminar on Nietzsche and 20th-Century Thought. He is a professor of philosophy, as well as a Senator and Secretary of the American Council for the school. Professor Fred Ulfers is a noted scholar with an emphasis on Friedrich Nietzsche, Franz Kafka, and the interdependence of literature, philosophy and science in the 20th century.

  • Gregory Ulmer, Ph.D., Joseph Beuys Chair at EGS, is Professor of English and Media Studies at the University of Florida. Gregory Ulmer received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Brown University (1972).

  • Agnès Varda (b. 1928 in Ixelles, Belgium) is a Paris-based key figure in modern film history and one of the world's leading filmmakers. Agnès Varda studied at the Ecole du Louvre with a focus on art history. She then went on to work at the Théâtre National Populaire as a photographer. Her first feature-length film, La Pointe Courte (1954), was an early anticipation of the French New Wave.

  • Paul Virilio (b. 1932 in Paris) is a world-renowned philosopher, urbanist, and cultural theorist. His work focuses on urban spaces and the development of technology in relation to power and speed. He is known for his coining of the term 'dromology' to explain his theory of speed and technology. Paul Virilio is of mixed ancestry, being the son of an Italian father (who identified as a Communist) and a Breton mother. As a small child in France during the Second World War, Paul Virilio was profoundly impacted by the blitzkrieg and total war; however, these early experiences shaped his understanding of the movement and speed which structures modern society. In order to escape the heavy fighting in the city, he fled with his family to the port of Nantes in 1939.

  • Victor J. Vitanza, Ph.D., Jean-Francois Lyotard Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, is Professor of English and Rhetoric at Clemson University. He is also the Director of the Ph.D. program at Clemson University in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design (RCID). Victor J. Vitanza is the Editor of PRE/TEXT: a journal of rhetorical theory, and the Director of the PRE://TEXT Publishing Webwork.

  • John Samuel Waters (born April 22, 1946) is an American filmmaker, actor, writer, journalist, visual artist, and art collector, who rose to fame in the early 1970s for his transgressive cult films.

  • Samuel Weber, Ph.D., (b. in New York) is Paul de Man Chair at the European Graduate School EGS, the Avalon Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University, and one of the leading American thinkers across the disciplines of literary theory, philosophy, and psychoanalysis. Samuel Weber has been Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Director of its Paris Program in Critical Theory.

  • Lebbeus Woods (b. 1940 in Lansing, Michigan) is a revolutionary, experimental, and theoretical architect. He is regarded as the most original architectural visionary alive today. His work is primarily focused on theorizing architecture in places in crisis. He is the founder of the Research Institute for Experimental Architecture (RIEA) and is a Professor of Architecture at the Cooper Union School of Architecture.

  • Caveh Zahedi (b. April 29, 1960) is an American film director and actor of Iranian descent. His films include I Am a Sex Addict (2005), Tripping with Caveh (2004), The World is a Classroom (2002), In the Bathtub of the World (2001), I Was Possessed by God (1999), I Don’t Hate Las Vegas Anymore (1994), A Little Stiff (1991). He appeared and acted in In the Bathtub of the World (2001), Waking Life (2001), A Sign From God (2002), Money Buys Happiness (2000), I Was Possessed By God (1999), Treasure Island (1999), Citizen Ruth (1996), I Don’t Hate Las Vegas Anymore (1994), and A Little Stiff (1991).

  • Krzysztof Zanussi (b. 1939 in Warsaw, Poland) is a renowned Polish filmmaker. He is a professor at the Silesian University (Katówice), and professor of European Film at the European Graduate School EGS. Krzysztof Zanussi runs the TOR Film Studios based in Poland.

  • Siegfried Zielinski, Ph.D., is Michel Foucault Chair at the European Graduate School EGS. He is also the Chair of Media Theory – with a focus on Archaeology and Variantology of Media – in the Institute for Time Based Media at the Berlin University of Arts.

  • Slavoj Zizek, Ph.D., is a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and a visiting professor at a number of American Universities (Columbia, Princeton, New School for Social Research, New York University, University of Michigan). He obtained his Ph.D. in Philosophy in Ljubljana studying Psychoanalysis. He also studied at the University of Paris. Slavoj Zizek is a cultural critic and philosopher who is internationally known for his innovative interpretations of Jacques Lacan. Slavoj Zizek is admired as a true 'manic excessive' and has been called the 'Elvis Presley' of philosophy. He is Author of The Indivisible Remainder; The Sublime Object of Ideology; The Metastases of Enjoyment; Looking Awry: Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture; The Plague of Fantasies and The Ticklish Subject.

  • Thomas Zummer, is an artist and lecturer at the Tyler School of Art and a visiting professor in critical studies in the Transmedia Programme at the Hogeschool Sint Lukas, Brussels, as well as visiting professor at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee. Thomas Zummer is an internationally aclaimed independent scholar and writer, as well as being an artist and curator.

  • Alenka Zupančič, Ph.D., is a Lacanian philosopher and social theorist, based as a full-time researcher in the philosophy department of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. She was born in 1966 in Slovenia. Alenka received her Ph.D. from the University of Ljubljana in 1990 and currently is a member of the the Ljubljana School for Psychoanalysis. At the European Graduate School, she holds a position as a lecturer where she teaches an intensive summer seminar on Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

  • Jan Zwicky, Ph.D., is a poet, essayist, philosopher, and violinist. She was born in Northern Alberta, Canada. Professor Zwicky did her B.A. at the University of Calgary and her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto, finishing it in 1981. The title of her dissertation was “A Theory of Ineffability.” Jan Zwicky has taught both philosophy and poetry but also creative writing. She has led many writing workshops and has even taught at the Banff Centre Writing Studio in Canada. Professor Jan Zwicky’s research and approach has naturally fitted in interdisciplinary humanities programs where she has taught at a number of North American universities.

Please take note, that the faculty overview includes lecturers, guest professors and core faculty members of European Graduate School who were invited or lectured at least once at European Graduate School. As such the list constitutes not a listing of current faculty members, but an archive of personal and academic associations.